BRONCHO Has The Hots For Your Ears

reppin: norman, ok // dine alone records // 2010 - present

sounds like: all we are is dust in the wind (according to the band) 

last album drop: double vanity (may 2016)

featuring: ryan // nathan // penny // ben

broncho

broncho

Sometime 8 short years ago lead vocalist Ryan, guitarist Ben, drummer Nathan and a former member (now featuring Penny) got together and said, “hey, let’s start a band called BRONCHO” (it did not actually happen like that). But, little did we know that this special indie band was about to stick together for some time and expanding their name beyond the middle of the country. I would call this a fun ass mixture of pop and fuzzy garage rock with some early sprinkles of punk from the 80s that will make you move. Ryan’s vocals balance super well with the melodies and after giving it a listen you’ll see why they kind of start alone.

That mixture of fuzz and that high, fluid elastic voice gives you a sense of just plain fun whether they are in the headphone or one the stage. And trust me, not all songs are created the same with these kids. Check out a track like “try me out sometime” to get up and moving against “fantasy boys” which has a bit of a darker twist. Honestly all you really need to do is get those tunes in your ears for a second and they will have you. They really do have something for everyone as they can be up-tempo, mellow out or get groovy.

After 3 full albums, it is apparent that BRONCHO has hit home with a growing number of fans who can’t wait to catch them live the next time around. That addictive sound is even better when they are on stage, but these tasty ear treats can really fit the mood on any occasion whatever it is you are doing. They did mention they want you to get in, experience their music, then get out...but you’ll want to stay. It will be really cool to see how they evolve in the future so go catch them this summer!

Check out the quick chat I was able to have with them ahead of their show at Subterranean tonight, April 27th.
 

interview stuff

 

Think back to when your journey as BRONCHO started, what would you tell your former selves now? Any regrets? Would you do it all the same? Are the same values important to you as a band?

We would tell ourselves to stay in school and study more. We regret nothing, except maybe that one time with the Thai food in Idaho. Our values have always been incredibly important to us, but sometimes it’s hard to find a good bargain.

 

broncho | subterranean, chicago | 7.15.17 | @thefaakehipster

broncho | subterranean, chicago | 7.15.17 | @thefaakehipster

When it comes to the stories you tell through your songs, what do you want do you want humans to get out of your lyrics?

Whatever they need to get out of lyrics. They should get in there and then get the hell out of there.

 

When it comes to touring, how do you channel your identity to the live stage? When you make eye contact with that fan or are warming up a room, what do you want them to feel?

They shouldn’t feel anything they don’t want to feel. That’s for sure. You should ask Jim Carrey about identity. We think he’s got it pretty well sorted out.

 

What, if any, rituals, goofy corks and all do you have as a band during pre-show prep or after the show? What gives you the most fulfilling moment during this process of getting to a gig to playing it to winding down at the end of the night?

 

Palo Santo and chanting. We cork merlot but Penny prefers prosecco. Most fulfilling moment is that free joint, the paycheck and a fluffy pillow.

 

Every post/article I do is drawn from the experience of listening and seeing music. I like to be very detailed and metaphorical. If you had to describe the identity of BRONCHO with a metaphor, what would it be?

All we are is dust in the wind.

suggested listening experience: summertime outside hanging with the friends // getting the morning started // any mode of transportation

listens: class historian // fantasy boy // stay loose // try me out sometime // get in my car // it's on // señora borealis

broncho // fb // spotify // ig // twitter

Black Pistol Fire - Rock N' Roll Cheese Eating Friends Since Kindergarten

reppin: austin, usa by way of canada // modern outsider // 2014 - present

sounds like: a sizzling plate of delicious cheese aka saganaki

last album drop: “deadbeat graffiti” (sept 2017)

featuring: eric // kevin

jared (left) hanging with eric (center) and kevin (right) during the black pistol fire interview | riot fest, 2017 | chicago |@thefaakehipster

jared (left) hanging with eric (center) and kevin (right) during the black pistol fire interview | riot fest, 2017 | chicago |@thefaakehipster

Lou Reed once said he would die for rock n’ roll because it is something so beautiful that you can feel. When I look at this genre, I couldn't agree more with the emotional connection that us humans can have with such an energetic sound. The raw and blistering guitar riffs and solos, lyrics about angst, love, life, death and everything in between. The audience, the atmosphere that can be created outdoor at festivals and inside at sweaty rock clubs. We individually become one and as one we can forget about the daily bullshit life brings us. Every genre of music, every type of melody and lyric and every type of musician and band can bring us all the good things in the world because music stands alone like that. With Black Pistol Fire, they bring all the rock and all the emotion for us to enjoy live.

Black Pistol Fire is described as high octane and that could very much be an understatement. Two dudes take the stage and then they start playing their instruments and you are like, “holy shit, how are these two guys making so much awesome noise together.” It really is a site to see Eric and Kevin really vibing off each other, the audience and just going balls to wall in their performance. You can tell they are having just as much fun as everyone watching them. Kevin will use the whole stage as he swings his guitar around with him and Eric pretty much beats the shit out his drums...oh those poor drums.

black pistol fire | bottom lounge, chicago | 12.7.17

black pistol fire | bottom lounge, chicago | 12.7.17

Cait and I had a chance to kick it with these cheese eating chill dudes after their stellar Riot Fest set. They really are just normal dudes with just enough weird in them that know how to play their instruments really well. Read away kids:

 

the interview

How did you guys meet and what past experiences attribute to you all making the music you do?

kevin: Well we actually met in kindergarten believe it or not in Toronto at a very young age. We were always very clsoe and all. We didn't really play music until we were in high school. Playing a lot of Nirvana, Oasis, Beatles and Weezer covers. Then we discovered Zeppelin and our whole world change.

me: it's crazy how times like that happen, you hear a band or a era of music and boom, your whole taste of music starts to expand.

kevin: Yea I was in a Zeppelin phase for like a year and wasn't really paying attention to everything else, I should have been. But it all came around for me once I started listening to more.

eric: I think the first real rock band I got into was Silverchair actually. You know also though, my parents listened to Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Chuck Berry. I was obsseded with that music.

me: So how did all of that land on Black Pistol.

kevin: I think when you hear us live you can tell I am coming from one area and Eric is coming from another. But we are both attacking at the same time with the same intensity.

 

So as you portray that on-stage, we literally were talking about how you are able to sound like more than two people.

black pistol fire interview | riot fest, 2017 | chicago |@thefaakehipster

black pistol fire interview | riot fest, 2017 | chicago |@thefaakehipster

kevin: You know I think everyone attacks it differently. You know we don't want to overplay, but raising the stakes. We definetly try to put out a lot of energy. We spend time with arrangements, rehearsing, how our dynamics are going to works on stage. The idea is that one part is high and loud and maybe the other is lower and quieter. A little of this is confusing people and having a natural build to the show so it isn't the same thing over and over. You have to hone that in and take advantage. Also, playing every single song like it's your last.

me: That has to be exhausting...but so rewarding.

No amount of cheese is ever too much cheese.

eric: Oh yea, for sure. I mean if you love what you do, you can beat the hell out of yourself and it doesn't really matter.

kevin: I know after shows we are so taxed, but the adrenaline rush is still there, you can't sleep or anything. It is a weird kind of feeling. One of our routines when we get off-stage, we like to take a big brick of cheddar cheese and just finish it off in about 15 minutes.

me: hahah. No amount of cheese is ever too much cheese. That is great.

kevin: It wears you out actually so you can sleep.

me: So eating a brick of cheese is as exhausting as the performance?

everyone: Yea!

IMG_20171208_165529_104.jpg

 

We are very big on lyrics and I am curious what the writing process is and how you want fans to react to it.

kevin: So for me, the music always comes first. I write something I really feeling and all and then the lyrics dictate the music and it's a merging of the two kind of. Sometimes I'll even look back at the lyrics later on and be like, huh, I think I know where I was at during that point. Maybe I was getting dark, maybe I was getting sassy. I don't think I ever sit down and say I am going to write a break up song or love song. I think you always leave room to see where it goes. The music sometimes evokes whatever emotion and words you are feeling at the time.

eric: I mean we always take lines too and if it doesn't work in one song, it can work in another. Spare puzzles.

kevin: Yea, sometimes we have that one lyric and hook.

I write something I really feeling and all and then the lyrics dictate the music and it’s a merging of the two kind of.

 

With all of that coming together, how do you guys challenge yourselves to evolve?

eric: I think the big thing is different genres of music are part of it. The new album that is coming out is a lot of different stuff and some stuff that we have never tried before. We listen to a ton of different music so you kind of say, how do you make your version of a hip hop song. I can elements from this genre and that one and try to fuse them together,

IMG_20180205_170012_383.jpg

kevin: Yea, we are constantly working in the studio, rehearsing and writing. It is always going. This new album coming out is the reflection of listening habits. I'm a big fan of albums in the world of playlists. But I like how an album can hop around with different types of sounds.

eric: We definitely want to change it up with speeds.

me: Yea I get that. I want to hear all the music, see all these bands and artists live so it can come back full circle and give me an understanding of the roots of my favorite music and everything else.

 

If you had to choose a metaphor to describe your sound and image, what would it be?

eric: Damn, that is a hard question.

kevin: Imagine doing a lot of blow then balancing it out with some booze. A booze filled 8-ball.

cait: Then eating some cheese!

kevin: Something that sizzles...

me: Saganaki!

kevin: Yes! We are a sizzling plate of delicious cheese.

 

suggested listening experience: outdoor summer night parties // getting amped up for the day // enjoying some sweet love making

listens: suffocation blues // hipster shakes // fleet foot // lost cause // beelzebub // where you been before

bpf // spotify // ig // twitter // fb

WHITE REAPER: Pure & Sweaty Rock N' Roll For All

reppin: louisville, ky // polyvinyl records // 2014 - present

sounds like: tony - "a very old muscle car that has be repaired frequently due to the high speeds at which it constantly performs"

tony of white reaper | metro, chicago | 11.14.17 | @thefaakehipster

tony of white reaper | metro, chicago | 11.14.17 | @thefaakehipster

last album drop: the world’s best american rock band (april 2017)

white reaper | metro, chicago | 11.14.17 | @thefaakehipster

white reaper | metro, chicago | 11.14.17 | @thefaakehipster

featuring: tony // ryan // sam // nick // hunter

When I come across a pure band like White Reaper, I get those goosebumps up my arm. The vibe of the tracks, the smoothness of the riffs and uniqueness of the vocals brings back memories of kids being kids. No responsibilities, I just want to go out on a Friday night and forget about my worries for a few hours. While it was a Tuesday night, looking around you would think it was the start to the weekend.

I scoped out these dudes back in May when they played the tiny, sweaty rock club that is Beat Kitchen. It was wild. Bodies everywhere, most of them crowd surfing, but I recalled the most from both shows were the smiles on everyone’s faces. That is the emotion is look to tap in every show I go to and every song I take into my ears. When I see it in the fans faces, in the performers on-stage, well that is why we are all living.

After Chicago’s own Post Animal took the stage, White Reaper came on and killed it. An hour of in your face rock n’ roll, good times, shredding solos and heavy bass. Kids of all ages were banging back and forth, looking to float above the crowd and get their faces overall melted. I shot off a few questions to frontman Tony and got some insight to these kids from louisville. How they have grown as a band during their short lifespan, write their songs and impact their dedicated fans across the country. Here it is in nice short form for you because we all have attention spans of 15 seconds these days.

interview stuff

You all have only been a band for 3 short years, yet you have landed on this clear rock n’ roll vibe that is obviously catching on. What have you all learned about each other as musicians that have allowed you to create this music?

The more we play the better we get. Seems obvious, I know but we were pretty stupid when we first started out. 

What is your songwriting process like? When you all sit down to start writing, how does it begin, what happens in order to carry through an idea into a track?

I usually come up with an idea, and then i show the guys to help me elaborate on it. We usually try to set up the framework and then pick apart the arrangement until we think its right. Then we dive into the trenches and hammer it out. 

white reaper | metro, chicago | 11.14.17 | @thefaakehipster

white reaper | metro, chicago | 11.14.17 | @thefaakehipster

What are you inspirations when it comes to lyrics? What do you hope fans as well as those who don’t know you, respond to your words?

Old mystery novels from the 40s and 50s are truly a vocabulary goldmine. Lyrics will always mean different things to different people. Sometimes lyrics don't have to mean anything at all!

Your live show is bananas...how do you bring the energy and vibes to your live set on a daily basis? How do you want the audience to feel after you play? 

We're pretty much bottled up in the van all day so by the time we get to stand up and move around we're pretty excited to not be stuck sitting down. Hopefully the audience is as sweaty as we are when the show is over.

Instead of comparing White Reaper to other bands I like to use a metaphor to describe the identity of the band...usually a humorous one. What is White Reaper’s metaphor?

A very old muscle car that has be repaired frequently due to the high speeds at which it constantly performs.

suggested listening experience: any party on any day or night // time to suck it up and get that project done before the deadline // waking up in the morning

listens: judy french // world’s best american band // make me wanna die // eagle beach // little silver cross // sheila // tell me // crystal pistol

wr // fb // spotify // ig // twitter // sc

interview stuff: PEARL EARL

reppin: denton, tx // dreamy life records // 2014 - present

sounds like: in stef's words - when two praying mantises meet and do a dance and they fall in love and then make sweet mantis love then the female eats the other one’s head off and then she has a baby (check out the bottom of the story for more good ones)

pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

last album drop:  pearl earl (july 2017)

featuring: ariel // stefanie // bailey // chelsey

pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

Something about summer nights and finding new music makes my mouth water, the hairs stand-up on my arms and my ears start begging me for some good sounds. It is nights like these that I seek inspiration, a feel good kind of story that answers the calls of expanding my mind and focusing in on what matters in life. Well, these four nice, sweet an bad-ass chicks delivered in just that way. Hailing from Denton TX, which I can only imagine as a hot summer spot with lots of good food, cowboy hats and denim, they have musically grown from within as well as taking in from the scene around them.

bailey of pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

bailey of pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

What I love about these ladies is that their music is parallel to the journey and goals they have as a band. Their sound blends the psychedelic feel from the 70s, garage rock from today and classic rock from way back when. The mysterious slice of exploration puts my my into an imaginative and open kind of space. I also can focus in on the bouncy sort of sound that reminds me that life can be fun and easy if you let it. Much like that psychedelic vibe, their free spirited nature has allowed them to find one another as their musical careers have moved forward. Then, there is the more focused idea that fun and love is so visible in their music. Something I can only allude to their music minds being flexible in nature, allowing them to let these different types of sounds blend. They each bring a bit of past to the picture, a favorite style of music that makes them a rare group.  

I happened to come across the girls that are Pearl Earl on the Jukely app as they were rolling through town this past July at the Empty Bottle on a chill Sunday night. I am telling you, the mixture of furious vocals, guitars mixed with that good old rock n' roll is something to pay attention to. Sitting down with these goofy girls, as fireworks were going off all over the city, we chatted about their adventure as Pearl Earl, what is to come and what they truly want out of being a band. I could immediately since the comfort they bestowed upon the venue as well as opening up to me, a complete stranger. Check out what makes these ones rev up their engine and go.

INTERVIEW STUFF

ariel of pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

ariel of pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

When did you all start as a band. How did you land on your sound, what happened in prior experiences that made you want to make this music?

Bailey: We started 3 years ago this August.

Ariel: I started the band back in the day, I was in the another group called Mink Coats and then I wanted to start Pearl Earl. Naturally just the kind of music I gravitate towards. After knowing Bailey, we just kind of played and learned more music together and I dunno, we are definitely influenced by more of the psychedelic sound. When we played together more and more and that’s what just sort of happened.

Stef: Bailey and I are def more into classic rock and Ariel is definitely more into psychedelic so I think that kind of meshes a current tone these days, while being centered around certain themes that were happening in Denton and Austin area. Certain rhythms were coming from more of a classic rock and prog driven area. The key parts kind of came in with a certain tone that bridges the generational gap of music.

Jared (Me): I personally like your music because you have one half of it that is just fun while the other half that is more in this clear mind kind of space, that lets your imagination run. It’s a really good balance

Bailey: You hit the nail on the head. We definitely try to split the fun and out there kind of vibe.

Alright, the lyrics. So usually I see lyrics being about something in specific, or something that wants to be interpreted. What is your style?

chelsey of pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

chelsey of pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

Ariel: So, I try to write really ambiguously for this project, but with hints at something that really does exist rather than not making it super personal. You know, I want it to be for everybody. I also kind of think of this as an experience as Pearl Earl. Also metaphorical. I try to be kind of witty with it...not take it too seriously, but I also have to remember there is going to be that serious, personal factor always there.

Me: I like interpreting lyrics, so thank you.

So what about the live show, what is your mission when you take the stage? What do you want to do in order to gain fans, what do you want them to experience?

Stef: We all have our own things

Me: Oh yea, hit me?

Ariel: She (Stef) has good eye contact and the running man down.

Stef: Yea, it is just constant movement with me. I can’t help it. Sometimes it is just hair in my face or other times I look up and try to make connect with someone. It may seem stupid, but its fun and engaging. I like to get engaged with them (bandmates). It can be very distracting and kind of almost a game. Sometimes when you get engaged with your bandmates, sometimes you just do it until someone fucks up, then you’re like alright, alright (laughs from everyone).

Ariel: We are all really into what one another is doing since we have our own way of interacting during the set.

chelsea of pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

chelsea of pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

Bailey: Honestly, all of our crowd engagement happens when we are not playing. We all disperse and talk to everyone and dance for the bands and hang out. Cause, if you do that, you have a fast friend and they’ll have you back.

Me: I like that, cause if you are not having fun on stage, then what is the point.

Ariel: You can tell if bands are disinterested and it sucks.

Chelsey: I don’t want to go see a sad, sappy band. I want energetic shit, something that will make me happy.

Stef: Not only does Chelsea do the keys, she does percussion as well. And she’ll tell you how different she is on stage.

Chelsey: Yeaaaa, I’m really quiet in person, but when I get on stage I am a different person, more wild. Last night, we played at an easy house show, there was no stage and I could walk out into the crowd. So if there is an opportunity where I can just walk into the crowd with a tambourine and get dancing and get hyped up. I’ll jump in there! Then everyone goes crazy. No one expects it (weird screams). I love it, easy access off the stage! One of the bands we traveled with was thinking we were trying to start pile-ons on stage and everything. Come on man, I can’t workout, so I am going to burn my calories on stage. The music is so energetic, there is no way you can be deadpanned.

stef of pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

stef of pearl earl | empty bottle, chicago | 7.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

Okay, finally, what is the metaphor for Pearl Earl?

Stef: It’s like, when two praying mantises meet and do a dance and they fall in love and then make sweet mantis love then the female eats the other one’s head off and then she has a baby.

Bailey: So actually, praying mantises have like 100 kids and they all fight until the death until there are four or something left.

Me: For real, this is true?

Bailey: Yea man, I’ve seen it, it’s nuts. (screams and cheers for fireworks)

Ariel: The one that I like that someone else said is we sound like the a scene from Fear and Loathing when all the lights change colors when you walk into the casino. And another one I liked, mystical wizard rock.

Stef: Rainbow fuzz power too!

suggested listening experience: mid-day pick me up // kicking it with with some friends // any kind of road trip

interview stuff: IAN SWEET

reppin: brooklyn, usa // hardly art records // 2015 - present

sounds like: according to the band - petting a dog at the beach that you know it isn’t yours and the owner is coming back soon...and the dog pooped on your hand

ian sweet | before empty bottle, chicago | 6.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

ian sweet | before empty bottle, chicago | 6.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

latest album drop: Sapeshifter (sept 2016)

featuring: jillian // damien // tim

It’s pretty amazing what musicians can learn about themselves in a short amount of time. Not too long ago, front woman Jillian Medford was touring the country as a solo project, pouring out her heart, a mixture of love and growing pains. As she settled in back East, a connection was established with drummer Tim Cheney and bassist Damien Scalise to form what now is IAN SWEET. Constantly touring and attempting to recreate their sound, they are on the start of a musically romantic adventure with one another and there is no end in sight.

With the popular DoDivision Fest hitting Wicker Park, IAN SWEET and good friends Girlpool packed a sold out Empty Bottle that night. When they hit the stage, emotions are evident as they roll through their set list. The lyrics spill out Jillian’s personal story, someone who has battled through personal relationships and then some. While that can be seen in her face, when you look at the crowd, everyone is overcome with joy. Whatever they are putting their fists up to, it shows that there is hope in the music they write. Sometimes you can use those words to overcome and other times, it is just good to know someone else is going through the same thing. My favorite message of all the experiences is to stay true to yourself...to be who you are no matter who you are with or what you are doing.

IAN SWEET’s fuzzy rock noise is something to pay attention to as they continue to grow as a band. They came in during a hot summer day this July in the smack dab middle of their tour. As I scooted up to the Empty Bottle, the crew hopped out of their van and were ready to rock n’ roll for the night. But first, we took a seat, cracked open some drinks and chatted about what makes these three a special group with a unique sound.

INTERVIEW STUFF

When I first turned you all on, it was like an organized mess of distorted chaos which could not be a more beautiful representation of my life. Surprisingly, with that description, your music puts a calm over me, like everything is going to be alright...how did you get there?

Tim: I fall asleep to heavy music a lot, that loud, distorted sound. It almost feels like being in the womb or something. Loud noises kind of calm me...maybe that is where you are getting that kind of feel

Jillian: I think we are all very attractive to sound in general, and sounds we haven’t heard. So we try to make noise that we are not familiar with, that are new.

ian sweet | empty bottle, chicago | 6.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

ian sweet | empty bottle, chicago | 6.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

Damien: I also feel like from the music we listen to, we like poppy stuff. I feel like we also have ears that and hear dissidence as confidence in a way. Things that sound crunchy and gross to someone else sound good to us.

Is there any relation to any experiences or stops in life that have led you to this?

Jil: Yea, when I went to college and started going to noise music shows in boston, underground scene. I wasn’t making music like that at the time, but always had a love and interest for it. And then, making friends through that scene I got involved and got inspired. There was a big scene for that and we kind combine noise and pop together.

Jared (Me): What is interesting to me, growing up in the Chicago burbs, I grew up in the punk scene and really took it to heart...I did listen to other types of rock and hip hop and stuff, but that was my music. But when I went away to college, my taste expanded like crazy and it goes to show what meeting different people from different places can do to your music listening.

Jil: As a band, we’ve gotten into hip hop together and didn’t listen to it as much in college. We’ve really been expanding our taste as well.

Jared (Me): Are we going to see a rap on the new album?

ian sweet | empty bottle, chicago | 6.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

ian sweet | empty bottle, chicago | 6.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

D: Yea man! Hahaha. Either way, I feel like hip hop is kind of at the forefront of music anyway. Rockstars aren’t rockstars anymore, anyone can be one. Even the pop stars are trying to emulate the hip hop stars. All the stuff that I know about in Boston came from nothing and built their way up to the top. I feel like that is really cool for independent musicians.

Jillian, I’ve read that you’ve had your fair share of shit to deal with over the years...how do you channel that into lyrics that are relatable to your fans as well as obtaining new ones

Jil: Yeaaaa, I’ve been through some shit. A lot of the lyrics are stream of consciousness stuff that I have to refine later on. I like to write while I have something in my hand...some blurb will come out. I have a style of writing that is more subconscious, in the moment. By the time a song is finished, I then realize what it is all about.

T: For you, I feel like the lyrics are very open for interpretation too.

Jil: Definitely use a lot of metaphors and playful lyrics to describe nostalgic memories. The past record was really heavily influenced by my nostalgia and how I wish to be in a better place. I was writing in a way where I was longing for something so the lyrics are more like what I would imagine I would do, being in a better headspace. Kinda projecting what I would like my emotions to be like. It is really hard as an artist to vulnerable because you know everyone is going to listen and watch you. The advice for fans listening is that it is not that scary and it feels better to be that way rather than being dishonest.
 

Speaking of getting onstage, how do you translate that into your live show. When you make eye contact with that kid, what do you want them to feel?

D: I think are live shows are a lot happier than you would think.

Jil: I was going to say, the live show is really emotional, it takes a lot out of me. It has ups and downs

D: It is a fun experience though…

Jil: I mean yea, we don’t take ourselves too seriously.

T: We definitely play sad songs a lot, but the second the song is over, we aren’t starting each other down crying, we are having fun.

D: I do think the lyrics do represent that in a way. Saying how we are struggling in a way, but it is kind of funny that we are struggling. The live show, it comes across that we are trying to be upbeat and when it is crowded it gets crazy.

(drinks are delivered and we become extremely surprised how much you cannot taste the alcohol)

If we are singing about sad stuff and someone comes in to see us and is sad, it makes for a happy experience with them.

Jil: We love miserable people

ian sweet | empty bottle, chicago | 6.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

ian sweet | empty bottle, chicago | 6.2.17 | @thefaakehipster

I always use funny metaphors to describe bands and artists i write about, what would you use?

T: Planting vegetables on the roof

Jil: Petting a dog at the beach

T: petting a dog at the beach, but you know it isn’t yours and the owner is coming back soon.

D: And once the owner comes, you realize that the dog pooped on your hand. I’d say we are all a bunch of dogs, as a band.

Jared: What kind of dog?

Jil: Great dane

suggested listening experience: on the train/car ride home after a long day // lazy saturday afternoon on the couch // anytime when times are tough

listens: #23 // slime time live // knife knowing you // all skaters go to heaven // 2soft2chew // if you're crying // cactus couch

is // spotify // fb // twitter // sc // ig

interview stuff: SURFER BLOOD

reppin: west palm beach, fl // joyful noise records // 2009 - present

sounds like: according to John Paul Pitts (JPP) - a dog chasing its tail, pure joy, a bit goofy..I’m going to catch that tail.

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

last album drop: snowdonia (feb, 2017)

featuring: john (lead vocals/guitar) // mike (guitar) // lindsey (bass) // tyler (drums)

Not so often does a band come across your ears that gives you a sense of calm no matter what the situation or headspace you are in. Maybe you are floating in the clouds and want to tell everyone about that new significant other or you had a shit day and you hate everyone. Flick over to Surfer Blood on your select music service and pop in your buds. JPP's soft and soothing vocals will bring you to write space. Mike’s simple guitar riffs and pleasant solos will lift your spirits. Lindsey’s running bass line will keep your head moving back and forth. Finally, the drums will bring it all together.  These kids hail from West Palm Beach and you can feel the ocean almost as you flip through their albums.

My favorite thing about these kids is that they are constantly teetering back and forth between a harder punk sound and a lighter flow of indie rock. It’s pretty special when a band can widen the spectrum and bring different feels to you with each song. There is overwhelming respect for them as well. While they played musical chairs with some band members for a bit, one of their dear friends, Thomas Fekete, passed away from cancer last year. It can really put some perspective on life and what you are trying to accomplish as a band.

These non-stop road hustlers have been making music for quite some time. They’ve played alongside the likes of Broken Social Scene, The Walkman, The Pixies and more. On top of that, their albums have constantly been hitting the top 200 on the US charts and show no sign of slowing down. As I got to interview frontman JPP, I came to realize the humility and love for playing music he has. Simply wanting to be part of the music scene is something pretty special.

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

INTERVIEW STUFF

You’ve been at it for almost 10 years, sorry to make you feel old, but I love your take on just constantly chugging out new records and touring. That concept, how does it help you find your sound and identity?

The reason we all got into this wasn’t to get rich or anything...it is more about making memories and having crazy experiences together. I turned 30 last year and I was looking back at my 20s and realizing I wouldn't trade it for anything. Traveling opens your mind, learn a lot. you meet a lot of interesting people and that certainly contributes to how we make music. We always want to stay consistent and to stay busy. All my favorite artists growing up were constantly putting out music and it is good to be one of those bands. We tour all the time and haven’t taken much time off in 7 years. It is a big world and there are lots of places to play and it keeps us really busy.

Jared: I really appreciate that. As a music fan, when a band always wants to be out on the road, be with their fans and constantly make music...that is when I see bands that are level with their audience. As a band, I can totally see how that sort of connection and communication can help you grow musically. There is something about really holding onto the individual.

Yea, I think we are one of the more acceptable bands around. It is just the four of us, We drive ourselves, we sell our own merch after the shows. We talk to people and sign stuff for them and while it is tiring to do that whole DIY approach, it is probably more fulfilling. We’ve been in situations before where people would sell our merch and schlep our gear and it felt weird.

Speaking of constantly touring, how do you channel your identity to the live stage. When you make eye contact with that fan or are warming up a room, what do you want people to feel?

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

That’s a good question. I guess, when you go to see a band and your favorite song plays and you feel that rush of energy. I want people to have a good time. We’ve played stuff from every one of our releases and we have a ton of material...over 40 songs now. I’m very proud of the fact that the albums are all different from each other. There are your 3 minute pop songs and your longer moody songs. Hopefully people get to have that feeling of hearing their favorite song. Also, maybe get exposed to some new stuff that they really haven’t listened to yet. Something old, something new.

Your lyrics where do you draw inspiration from and how ...You’ve experienced of some band members switching out, medical conditions, how does that affect you personally and help you grow as an individual and band?

For one, it builds character. Going through all this stuff gives you some really great perspective as a band. You are constantly playing these shows, you are tired. I think seeing everything that Thomas went through gives you an appreciation for being alive and doing whatever you want. Thomas came from a family of musicians and music was always something very sacred to him. That is something I always try to keep in mind all the time, even when I am tired and want to go home. Doing something like this is so precious, so fragile.

Jared: Does that appreciation and experiences channel through into your lyrics?

It does man. I never sit down and say I am going to write a song about this. A lot of times, when I am done writing a batch of songs, I’ve really figured out what is going on in my head. You know what I mean. It is hard to keep tabs on it sometimes. If anything, writing is quickest way to sort that all out. How could it not come through, you know.

The fact is people go through their lives and never reflect or think it’s necessary. I feel like it totally is. I’m a more sane person, I have a clear idea of where I am.

I always use funny metaphors to describe bands and artists i write about, what would you use?

A dog chasing its tail - pure joy, a bit goofy...I’m going to catch that tail. (He came out firing right away with that answer)

suggested listening experience: hanging in your backyard with your best buds // cruising down the highway with the windows down // getting your day started

listens: matter of time // floating vibes // demon dance // prom song // frozen // anchorage // six flag in F or G // swim

sb // spotify // fb // twitter // ig // sc

interview stuff: L.A. WITCH

reppin: la, usa // suicide squeeze records // 2013 - present

sounds like: according to them (and Holy Wave): "we are a spider eating other baby spiders in a cave deep in the forest and there is a motorcycle driving off in the distance"

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

next album drop: L.A. Witch (debut out September 8th) PRE-ORDER HERE

featuring: sade // irita // ellie

Think about your week so far...how many instances have you had where you just wanted to say “fuck off” or you needed a moment to just shake off the anger, the stress and the typical bullshit of daily life. I dig tunes that can speak to certain aspects of life. The rad, rocker chicks that are Sade, Irita and Ellie have tunes for you so you can chew up and spit out whatever it is that you can’t shake off. This beautiful kick in the throat that spills from their amps and drums is a blender of garage and psychedelic rock with a sprinkle of punk and reverb. They will throw you back to the 60s and will literally make you think of dark, deep witches.

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

What began as a few friends meeting in high school turned into a band around 2013 and blossomed into something special. As we got to kick it on a rainy, early summer night, I could notice the calm over them as well as the chemistry that has built them into road warriors. They really have been a tight knit group for some years now and are ready to make some noise with their new record, which you can pre-order HERE. Hailing from LA, it is hard for bands to stand out above the crowd, but these ladies are quickly rising above the clutter. While stuff can happen quick and fast, I don’t detect any sort of fear in these ones.

After we sat down for the interview we got to kick it through the night with their good friends, Holy Wave, and the fun carried over. Beers, shots, perhaps a special delivery of greenery complements of my brother went down and it was the perfect lead up to their set. They don’t need to talk much as they take the dimly lit stage. They move through each song swiftly and you can tell they are focused on one another, in the zone if you will. When they go into their solos, you literally can just lay back and not give a shit since the instruments take you to this dream like state. The riffs are powerful and the vocals are deep, dark and delightful. As the set rolls through the crowd engagement picks up and the feels settle amongst the venue. You need to catch these kids live.

As for the interview, check out how they discovered their sound, why they write the lyrics they do and how they try to channel that into their live show. I should note that things started off on a great note before I even got to ask a questions we talked about the past few weeks...a few quotes:

“She just ate an edible the other day and that killed her.”

“In Austin we took some acid and it was like really strong. We were told, take 2 of these and be careful...it’s been a pretty fun tour so far.”

INTERVIEW STUFF

Simply put, your music takes me to a “i don’t give a fuck” space...everyone needs a i don't give a fuck moment everyday. Is that something you try to do with your sound. What do you want to get out of that fan listening to you?

Sade: We want our fans to feel inspired and take whatever they want and can from our songs. If they want to interpret songs to cater to their needs, then that is what we want. It is for everyone to listen to.It is always really cool to hear people say they started bands because they saw us or we make them want to pick up an instrument again or work harder at one. Even the people who do not plan on playing music. If you can find a connection that makes you stronger, then that is cool.

Let’s talk lyrics. They are super relatable and really left open ended, like sometimes, what the fuck are you talking about? “Save me from myself” is something that sticks out...Are there any moments as a band or before you became a band that led to this theme and foundation?

Sade: I mean, wait, I forgot the question (laughs)

It all happens way more spontaneous. We don’t really plan it out, you know. We’ll come together, maybe bring a piece of a song or lyric to the table and we’ll all sit and work on it...then it forms into something. For this upcoming album, it wasn’t really anything that was planned. There was no song on there that was, wait, this is going to be atheme. It was all very naturally put together, what we were building as we went through and wrote. In the future that may not exactly be how it is, the lyrics may be more complex. For what we have right now, we have that whatever happens kind of vibe.

That same “fuck you” idea...your tracks give me a sense of relatability. How do you channel that into your live show? What is going thru your mind as you are making eye contact with that one human out there?

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

Ellie: As a drummer...I just want them to feel like they are on the same page as us...raw emotion.

Sade: Yea I agree with ...I want them to feel what we feel as much as possible. We don’t exactly focus too much on the audience, it is not like we are ignoring them, but by connecting with each other on stage, we are being as honest as we can as a band. Even if that means we have to feel like we are in our own little bubble, that is for the fans. It is really scary to perform and throw yourself out there, so we are still learning to work with the audience and see what different ways we can connect with them.

I always use funny metaphors to describe bands and artists i write about, what would you use?

We are a spider eating other baby spiders in a cave deep in the forest and there is a motorcycle driving off in the distance

suggested listening experience: twist, smoke and chill // road tripping // on the ride home after a long day

listens: kill my baby tonight // untitled // get lost // heart of darkness // haunting

lw // spotify // fb // twitter // sc // ig

interview stuff: BEACH SLANG

reppin: phili, usa // 2013 - present // polyvinyl

sounds like:  loud, sloppy hurricane // drunk and dirty church

latest album drop: a loud bash of teenage feelings (sept 2016)

featuring: james // ed // aurore // cully

james alex | beach slang | house of blues, chicago | 4.6.17

james alex | beach slang | house of blues, chicago | 4.6.17

When I first heard word that I was going to be able to sit down with a legend, the butterflies naturally float around there. But, I am a big boy, took a deep breath and soaked in the idea of not just chatting with James Alex, but being able to learn a thing or two from him. Hailing from a time when Jawbreaker and The Replacements were punk Gods (sorry buddy, you have a few years on me), he really took to heart the angst as a teenager, but the joy of being part of a scene that he could relate to. Being a weird reject can blossom one into a creative human and positive influence on others. Life lessons, right?


I tend to take an idea, a big thought and split it into two paths as it honestly keeps life very real and at least somewhat more simple. There are those who can take experiences and just not learn and repeat the same mistakes. There are those who take those same experiences and become a strong and better person for the world. Mr. Alex is the latter without a doubt. Throw in your headphones, switch it on over to Beach Slang and let me take you through a magical and eye opening conversation. A punk rocker, a father and what I came to learn, an overall awesome dude you just want to have a beer and shoot the shit with.


Interview Stuff

I love your gritty, raw rock sound...Alkaline, Jawbreaker..there is something about your sound that makes you more relatable and comfortable to listen to. How do you channel that into your live show? What is going through your mind as you are looking into the audience?

Right on man, The whole thing to me is just about that very connection. When we recorded this last record I remembered first saying to the engineer, “look man, I just want to make a live record.” I want that honesty with no divide. I dig that because the whole thing is this cyclical exchange of energy. It made me think about earlier on in life and it was always embarrassing to me when bands think they are Gods. I look at my fans as this idea of throwing energy back and forth at each other. I really believe our records are what we are. It’s that honesty that I want. It’s imperfect. We try to get everything in the 2nd or 3rd take because you can make everything so perfect now, it kind of massages all the soul out of it. If that goes, I think the whole thing that makes what Beach Slang does goes with it. We exist in that, we aren’t trying to be prodigy players. That is punk rock. There isn’t that crazy technical prowess, but the heart of it comes through.

The straightforward lyrics are legit..and a lot are about love. Specifically I love that little line in Bad Art & Weirdo Ideas, “too fucked up to love, too soft to hate.” What are you trying to tell your fans through these stories?

beach slang | house of blues, chicago | 4.6.17 | @thefaakehipster

beach slang | house of blues, chicago | 4.6.17 | @thefaakehipster

I think in the broadest brush stroke I could paint it in: This is life and it is happening. Bite into it and live it all the way. That know you are enough thing. So many people get hung up, and I’m guilty to, of getting caught up in their shortcomings and their failures. It’s more about these weirdo paths we have to take to get to where we want to go. I try to plant that idea of romance in the struggle. Be okay with that. Listen, I have written probably a million fucking terrible songs and there are 30 that may be okay. That’s cool. When I get to one of those, it makes me feel something, it means so much more. This isn’t trust fund rock n’ roll, I didn’t get handed it, I had to work for it. Sometimes you have to take a moment and sort of stop and think about it in broader terms for something like this to really work.

Me: Yes, yes yes. What you do in music is what I go through at work. I’ve fucked up so many times.

I remember when I was first growing up and picking up a guitar, there is this Bouncing Souls lyric: “you are not at the bottom, you are at the beginning.” And that line is just is always stuck around in my head when it does feel like gloom is knocking away the light. I don’t why, maybe it was because I was at that age where it just made sense.

Me: Hey man, I got my lyric tattooed to me soooo (laughs)

It cut in right when I was getting turned on and figuring stuff out. It really has a permanent mark on me.

beach slang | house of blues, chicago | 4.6.17 | @thefaakehipster

beach slang | house of blues, chicago | 4.6.17 | @thefaakehipster

You’ve been around the block playing music, touring, being the leader of the wolf pack, etc, etc...music is about experience to me. What’s the best one, or at least one of the tops you’ve had?

Man, I don’t know, the individual occurrence I am not really sure. To what I just alluded to, the acceptance and appreciation of persistence. I’m into that. Even when stuff starts to fall into place, I’m still looking for the grain to grind against. Quoting myself is so stupid, “I need the struggle to feel alive.” If I buy a place on easy street I’m not going to know how to do it. I kinda need that thing to sort of grind against. What I have found in small successes and big failures, navigating the waters of rock n’ roll….really loving the idea of the struggle of it all. Dig the idea of persistence. Not get beat by things. Even the way I can write now, I couldn’t do it before, my bones were too brittle, I didn’t have the guts, the provado cause I was hit then with mean critics...I would have shattered. My spine is kinda steeled up now, still in a soft way. I read this interview with Joe Strummer once...and this is fucking Joe Strummer off the Clash, and he understood that not everyone is going to dig something and that’s cool. It’s just not for you. In just him saying that, which is so common sense, but until you hear it and digest it..it really means something. Like okay, go find out what turns you on.

Me: Maybe I steered you somewhere else that will help you be happy.

Right on, I’m looking at the bigger picture and trying to chuck happiness at people. And if it is not through our band maybe you just dislike this so much, I am challenging you to write better than that. Now maybe the thing that lights you up is that you started a band or a book and I happened to be a catalyst in getting you there. I really dig the idea of that.

Me: Yea, I’ve probably done that same thing to numerous girls (laughs laughs laughs)

What has the rotating members you’ve had taught you about Beach Slang and where you want to go as a band?

beach slang | house of blues, chicago | 4.6.17 | @thefaakehipster

beach slang | house of blues, chicago | 4.6.17 | @thefaakehipster

That’s a great question. It has been a bouncy kinda thing. I am a pretty self-contained unit in terms of writing. I don’t think we’ll ever have that issue. I think what is painting for us is the idea of getting it right on two levels. For me, getting it right as a band and as musicians, that is absolutely necessary for what we are doing professionally. The bigger thing for me is, you know aside from singing in a band, is being a great human being. I really want to try to be some force of good in the world. The lineup changes almost have more to do with getting chemistry right,. We march across the country and there are 5 of us including Charlie (tour manager), she is just as much in it. I dig how we are represented on stage...I think we have been getting that right from the beginning. But off stage, that’s equally as important to me, if not more. I think we are finding our footing a little better. Look, everyone who has played and been part of this, I root for them in what they are chasing now, but I gotta say, it has never felt more right.

beach slang | house of blues, chicago | 4.6.17 | @thefaakehipster

beach slang | house of blues, chicago | 4.6.17 | @thefaakehipster

Me: That’s good, that does not happen unless you go through the shit before

It’s like a lot of life, you are learning in two ways. You see one thing that is aspirational and then you see the other stuff and you’re like, now I know not to do that. And Slang being a rock n’ roll band is no different. We’ve fucked up plenty. We keep marching on with no animosity. I want everyone to be friends.

I always use funny metaphors to describe bands and artists i write about, what would you use?

I’ve described it as a loud, sloppy hurricane. It’s drunk and dirty church. Look man, I came up with The Replacements being my favorite band. There is an importance to plugging in, turning up and going. Whenever I do radio shows or acoustic performances. Would you want to record that again you feel happy with that. Well, I messed up, but no. I just want it to be honest and real. In that imperfection, it goes back to what we were first talking about man, the connection. We see each other as humans. When I was a kid and getting turned on to Yes...I’m never going to be able to play 3 keyboards at once! (laughs). It was relatable to me. But then I saw The Ramones and I played along to the records. Then there was an immediate gratification and it was just so relatable. People have come up to me and said watching Beach Slang...I can do that. And I’m like, fuck yea, that is what I want, that was me when I was coming up. All of the sudden music became attainable.

Me: As a music fan...I always go back to that moment when I discovered that band, even when I listen to them. To me, that is as relatable in life as it gets.

That relatability has really paid dividends to me. Really too, while playing music keeps the lights on at home, I’m just a fan of rock n’ roll. I’m jazzed most of the time when we go on tour with that band you never heard of and I’m like, I think I just found my new favorite band.

suggested listening experience: at the gym letting off some steam // rocking out with your friends on a saturday // finding clam and comfort when shit is not right

interview stuff: WARBLY JETS

reppin: la, usa // 2015 - present

featuring: samuel shea // julien o'neil // dan gerbang // justin goings

next album drop: most likely 2017

sam & jules of warbly jets | beat kitchen, chicago | 2.19.17 | @thefaakehipster

sam & jules of warbly jets | beat kitchen, chicago | 2.19.17 | @thefaakehipster

I wrote about these cool cats back in early December when I caught them and fellow rockers Mystery Lights at The Empty Bottle. What did it for me with these guys was not the one brilliant anthem, “Alive,” which is truly a hit. What got me hooked was how they draw you in with their sweet riffs, Sam’s killer vocals and just raw rock n’ roll baby. They can reel you in with their stage presence and melt your face with their loud sound. I wanted to get beneath the surface a bit, see what inspires these kids and bring their musical experience to your ears (and eyes if you like to read).

warbly jets | beat kitchen, chicago | 2.19.17 | @jpalove

warbly jets | beat kitchen, chicago | 2.19.17 | @jpalove

Let’s start from the beginning...some of you have been in other bands, paid your dues, went on tour...seasoned musicians if you will. What do these past elements, experiences, successes, failures mean to you as they relate to creating Warbly Jets?

Sam: I think everything in life shapes you as you go thru it, you know. All those things throughout our lives have played huge influencer roles towards what we have turned into. Jules and I definitely went through quite a lot of struggling, whether it was our project in new york together or the other projects we were apart of separately, moving to LA together and staying in a lot of motels and friends couches and bouncing around. Waiting to meet members...a lot of that has shaped our music and message, that’s in the lyrics

warbly jets | beat kitchen, chicago | 2.19.17 | @jpalove

warbly jets | beat kitchen, chicago | 2.19.17 | @jpalove

Me: The growing pains?

S: Yea, you know the reshaping, the trimming back. Trimming of the branches so they can bloom back. That happens with every band.

Jules: We have a pretty clear definition of what we are trying to do with our previously histroy separately and as a group. We’ve learned a lot, made some mistakes, had some successes. We know how and what to do now.

What’s to come for the album...what was it like recording together? Did it take some time to find your sound or was it pretty clear from the start?

J: So Sam and I had gotten together and we kind of knew what direction we wanted to put this band in. And because of being in other bands, being around the block, we knew how to start the project from the ground up. We didn’t really reveal anything, kept it under wraps until we found that sound. The only way to do that was put ourselves in a studio and write song after song after song after song. Chipping away at the marble and finding out what this was really going to be.

S: Painters will choose a pallet of colors and it’s kind of the same thing. These are the things we are into, these kind of sounds, these kind of instruments. Figuring out what those songs are from the start, It makes things easier to determine what that mission is. It’s us choosing the colors we want to use on the pallet.

warbly jets | beat kitchen, chicago | 2.19.17 | @jpalove

warbly jets | beat kitchen, chicago | 2.19.17 | @jpalove

Me: I truly value bands that know what their identity is from the start and can start the evolution from there instead of churning out singles to get on the air or something.

S: We want to have that natural identity and not sound super manufactured. A lot of bands will come out with this identity and style, but when you look further in, there is a machine behind them. That is most definitely not us. We built everything on our own.

Let’s talk about the single, “Alive,” what you hope to accomplish on tour? This song just kind of came out of nowhere, how do you

S: That single is the only song we have out. It’s streaming, been doing well, got picked up on Sirius XM and that helped out. And for whatever reason it has been getting on some good playlists on Apple and Spotify. It’s growing very organically go, not too much juice behind it aside from our management group, Rebel Union, sending it around. Everything that has happened has been organic and homegrown coming from the crew of people

Me: That’s a pretty sweet thing. Radio is not as familiar to me, but if you have an organic sort of start, it can help further your mission to be authentic and real.

S: It has def given us a realization that we can really take anything we want really far...just our team. We know that for a fact.

Liam Gallagher Pretty Green clothing line - what is this Brit stuff all about?

J: It’s Liam’s company and they pretty much reached out to us and wanted to use the song for the spring/summer campaign promotion. I’m not sure how much he really has to do with it or if he actually designs the clothes himself...

S: It’s designed and owned by him, I don't know how involved he is, but I hear he is pretty hands on with the company.

Me: That’s still really rad to get the song to the UK that quickly

S: Yea. it would be nice to get out there the next few months, we really want to crack the UK

warbly jets | beat kitchen, chicago | 2.19.17 | @jpalove

warbly jets | beat kitchen, chicago | 2.19.17 | @jpalove

The Show - 3 adjectives or a tweet like summary to describe the live show?

S: Something you’ll tell your friends about…?

J: Interesting question, I never really thought about that too much.

Me: I always like to look at the energy and connection to the crowd as well as the lyrics and personally try to relate to what the experience is

S: Yea, I mean, we just always wanted to be a band that is just larger than life and too big for the room. You know we talk some, but we want people to understand that we will be playing a room twice as big the next time we are here.

I always use funny metaphors to describe bands and artists i write about, what would you use?

J: Sounds like jumping off a cliff with a trampoline at the bottom

S: Getting shot out of a canon at the top of Mt. Everest

Me: Damn, most bands take like 5/10 minutes to figure that out, well done dudes (laughs).

wj // fb // spotify // ig // twitter // sc