BRONCHO Has The Hots For Your Ears

reppin: norman, ok // dine alone records // 2010 - present

sounds like: all we are is dust in the wind (according to the band) 

last album drop: double vanity (may 2016)

featuring: ryan // nathan // penny // ben

broncho

broncho

Sometime 8 short years ago lead vocalist Ryan, guitarist Ben, drummer Nathan and a former member (now featuring Penny) got together and said, “hey, let’s start a band called BRONCHO” (it did not actually happen like that). But, little did we know that this special indie band was about to stick together for some time and expanding their name beyond the middle of the country. I would call this a fun ass mixture of pop and fuzzy garage rock with some early sprinkles of punk from the 80s that will make you move. Ryan’s vocals balance super well with the melodies and after giving it a listen you’ll see why they kind of start alone.

That mixture of fuzz and that high, fluid elastic voice gives you a sense of just plain fun whether they are in the headphone or one the stage. And trust me, not all songs are created the same with these kids. Check out a track like “try me out sometime” to get up and moving against “fantasy boys” which has a bit of a darker twist. Honestly all you really need to do is get those tunes in your ears for a second and they will have you. They really do have something for everyone as they can be up-tempo, mellow out or get groovy.

After 3 full albums, it is apparent that BRONCHO has hit home with a growing number of fans who can’t wait to catch them live the next time around. That addictive sound is even better when they are on stage, but these tasty ear treats can really fit the mood on any occasion whatever it is you are doing. They did mention they want you to get in, experience their music, then get out...but you’ll want to stay. It will be really cool to see how they evolve in the future so go catch them this summer!

Check out the quick chat I was able to have with them ahead of their show at Subterranean tonight, April 27th.
 

interview stuff

 

Think back to when your journey as BRONCHO started, what would you tell your former selves now? Any regrets? Would you do it all the same? Are the same values important to you as a band?

We would tell ourselves to stay in school and study more. We regret nothing, except maybe that one time with the Thai food in Idaho. Our values have always been incredibly important to us, but sometimes it’s hard to find a good bargain.

 

broncho | subterranean, chicago | 7.15.17 | @thefaakehipster

broncho | subterranean, chicago | 7.15.17 | @thefaakehipster

When it comes to the stories you tell through your songs, what do you want do you want humans to get out of your lyrics?

Whatever they need to get out of lyrics. They should get in there and then get the hell out of there.

 

When it comes to touring, how do you channel your identity to the live stage? When you make eye contact with that fan or are warming up a room, what do you want them to feel?

They shouldn’t feel anything they don’t want to feel. That’s for sure. You should ask Jim Carrey about identity. We think he’s got it pretty well sorted out.

 

What, if any, rituals, goofy corks and all do you have as a band during pre-show prep or after the show? What gives you the most fulfilling moment during this process of getting to a gig to playing it to winding down at the end of the night?

 

Palo Santo and chanting. We cork merlot but Penny prefers prosecco. Most fulfilling moment is that free joint, the paycheck and a fluffy pillow.

 

Every post/article I do is drawn from the experience of listening and seeing music. I like to be very detailed and metaphorical. If you had to describe the identity of BRONCHO with a metaphor, what would it be?

All we are is dust in the wind.

suggested listening experience: summertime outside hanging with the friends // getting the morning started // any mode of transportation

listens: class historian // fantasy boy // stay loose // try me out sometime // get in my car // it's on // señora borealis

broncho // fb // spotify // ig // twitter

Dead Meadow: Zen Going 20 Years Strong

reppin: dc, usa // xemu // 1998 - present

sounds like: according to jason - Dead Meadow is like a favorite episode of “Columbo”.  Entirely soothing with a hint of the unnerving and the bizarre.  

last album drop: the nothing they need (march 16, 2018)

featuring: jason // steve // juan
 

Dead Meadow | photo cred: Jessica Senteno

Dead Meadow | photo cred: Jessica Senteno

A few years back, when the Double Door was still alive and well, I stumbled into the venue to check out Dead Meadow during a warm summer day. They mesmerized my ears and mind with a calming yet heart-pounding set of rock along with a visually stunning projection of animation and color. That night they wheeled me in and grabbed me by the arms, not letting go until I was cleared in my head and melted in my face (I was able to put it back on). However, their story goes way further back to a city that was music rich back in the late 90s.

Back during the 1980s and 90s, DC was on the map when it came to the uprising of emo, punk and hardcore bands. Minor Threat, Fugazi and The Dismemberment Plan are cemented as vital bands in that era, and from it came a combination of two bands to form Dead Meadow. With some experience behind them already, they combined 70s heavy metal and 60s psychedelic rock, creating a simple, yet fantasy world of sound...always stretching your imagination. They have no fear of jumping off their usually script as they’ve had albums in the past with a heavier blues influences and acoustic elements.

In 2018 we are celebrating 20 years of this group. They have toured the world, shuffled their lineup like most long-time bands would, but have always kept their fans, gained new ones and established themselves as legends among countless newer bands trying to join the fold. They have clearly laid out a path for not just success, but happiness, fruitfulness and fulfillment as a band. Their latest release just a few short weeks ago, The Nothing They Need, is shelter in a way according to the band. There is much negative energy that blankets us these days and the sounds and visuals of the new album are meant to be an escape. So, come on and escape as these guys answer some of my questions ahead of their Chicago gig at Beat Kitchen.

beat kitchen tickets - april 4

interview stuff

Think back to when you formed as a band, through those first early releases. What would you tell your former selves now. Any regrets? Would you do it all the same? Are the same values important to you as a band?

steve

Dead Meadow's recent release: The Nothing They Need

Dead Meadow's recent release: The Nothing They Need

jason: Yeah there never was really much of a choice about doing something else.  I think I always knew it wouldn’t be an easy road but I think you’ll find most people involved in spending their life in pursuit of any creative endeavor feel it as a sort of calling.  I think the primary value that was true in the beginning and now is to stay as true to our creative vision as possible. You know most of what I love and have been influenced by has most always been work that seems to cater to a certain niche crowd off the beaten track.  I guess it is only natural that the band has cultivated a similar sort of following.


There is a heavy influence in your music from the 60s and 70s: rock n’ roll, metal and psychedelic rock. To me, especially in the late 60s, that’s when lyrics turned from questioning to more raw feelings and angst. What do you want to tell your fans with your lyrics?

jason: Well I rarely have a direct message in mind that I am trying to convey.  Songs tend to be more mediations on certain themes and feelings. I find for me it is most important to try and be open as much as possible in order to catch those phrases and lines when the come.  Where they come from is a whole other question. Whether you feel they come from within, without, on high, deep below, certain things feel inspired and worth building into a cohesive whole…well, cohesive at least for me.


When it comes to touring, how do you channel your identity to the live stage? When you make eye contact with that fan or are warming up a room, what do you want them to feel?

Dead Meadow | photo cred: Jessica Senteno

Dead Meadow | photo cred: Jessica Senteno

steve: for me there is a zen like place with the energy of a room that really pushes the music out. In my mind even when caught in the moment I still am thinking if what we are doing is believable and feels true.. Like as simple as rocking out how far is goofy and what isn't enough. You need to be comfortable with your message being received by the audience at all times otherwise it can be too cartoon like.

jason: I feel all I can really do is attempt to lose myself in the present moment of creating music and play to the best of my ability.  If I feel I’m achieving that hopefully the fans can come on the same enjoyable journey that I’m on.

 

What, if any, rituals, goofy corks and all do you have as a band during pre-show prep or after the show? What gives you the most fulfilling moment during this process of getting to a gig to playing it to winding down?

Dead Meadow | Double Door, Chicago | 5.17.16

Dead Meadow | Double Door, Chicago | 5.17.16

steve: i guess a few drinks and laughs can help it be comfortable. I feel our fans can be a bit of the inebriated variety so sometimes it is good to be on the same level. Really the actual talking to the fans and meeting people face to face is the most rewarding. It is really cool to know everyone and what makes them interested in seeing us. I kinda feel I I would get the same enjoyment from a meet and greet only tour.. Like playing the songs is great and moving but it is the contact with people that really makes playing live music so special.

jason: yeah, no green room seances or warm up chants for us… a drink or two, a spiff… etc…   It’s always nice once everything is set and our intro drone is rolling to take a minute to breath and relax.  


Every post/article I do is drawn from the experience of listening to and seeing live music. I like to be very detailed and metaphorical (not a fan of comparing bands to other bands, critiquing or reviewing) If you had to describe the identity of Dead Meadow with a metaphor, what would it be?

jason: Dead Meadow is like a favorite episode of “Columbo”.  Entirely soothing with a hint of the unnerving and the bizarre.

 

suggested listening experience: twist one up // sunny evening, winding down // when you need to find your space and mellow out

listens: nobody’s home // what needs must be // greensky greenlake // sleepy silver door // 1000 dreams // keep your head // heaven // 'til kingdom come

dm // spotify // ig // twitter // fb

Madrid’s Baywaves Are Flipping Indie Rock on It’s Head

reppin: madrid, spain // Ground Control // 2014 - present

sounds like: the moment before you crash onto a nice, big comfy couch

last album drop: only for uz EP (march 2016)

featuring: fran // david // marco // carlos

baywaves | photo cred: noesfm.com

baywaves | photo cred: noesfm.com

Last summer I stumbled across a little known band from Madrid that goes by the name of Baywaves. What started as a duo became a 4-piece, kinda pop, kinda rock, kinda electronic, kinda indie band of really really young dudes. In what they refer to as hipnopop, you really get a different, new kind of vibe that some recent Madrid bands are bringing these days. Young dudes just flipping rock on its head, no big deal.

What drew my ears in to Baywaves was this sense of hypnotic dance sound that is very different from anything else we are listening to these days. It releases your body, frees your mind and gives you happy sort of vibes all over. What is even more exciting is how young they are and how much is ahead in the evolution of this band. They totally get the amazing position they are in and will stop at nothing to keep challenging themselves to create newer and fresher tunes.

These are true newcomers on the scene as they just finished up with some SXSW sets the other week. I am getting the feels that they’ll start following in the footsteps of labelmates The Hinds and The Parrots and be hitting the states regularly for our ear and eyes pleasure. Check out the skype chat I had with these young lads and get on their music!


interview stuff
 

Y’all are babies in the music world, but have nailed it with that first EP...where did your sound come from and how do you see it evolving over the coming years?

That's a good questions right now because we are in the process of making new songs and we are trying to evolve from that. At first it was mostly David making the tracks and that has been going on for a year and half. We like to use references of bands we enjoy like Manchester Orchestra, Pond, King Gizzard and the Wizard Lizard. Then, as we started to take part in this process, we've been listening to more and more. We all come from different background so we have a wide variety of taste. So now, we are just listening and listening and figuring out what to do next. I mean, we just bought a sampler and other equipment.

We are really trying to see what can work next because we know our sound now and what we used to have is working for us and our listeners. We're just trying to know if we can play different types of sound, like experimenting. Can we do this? Maybe we'll find some new things to incorporate into our new music. You know, one day we were listening to some new hip-hop and we're like oh shit, this is giving us a boner. We don't want to keep playing the same type of music.

 

As a band, what are you learning about yourselves as things are happening so fast? What is the most important factor to keep things together?

baywaves | photo cred: diymag.com

baywaves | photo cred: diymag.com

That is also a good question because we are also in the process of seeing what ties the bands together. Some of work, some of us our in school studying and getting masters. It is very difficult to find a time with energy to give to the band. So, what ties the band together? If anything, it sound quite cynical, is the idea of just having a band and being able to come here and play. It really depends on the moment. It is a really amazing feeling when we create something together and are like, "oh, that's amazing!"

Right now, making a new song, the whole process, it is something that ties us together because it allows us to really focus on the music. There really isn't one thing that ties us together. All these new things are happening every month, but it always comes back to this idea of just having a band. We are all really enjoying the process. We usually don't even have enough time to think about what is next when something ends because the next thing is happening.

Even just playing in front of fans and having them tell us great things, that keep us going. We've also been trying to build a network with other bands our age. You know, 5 years ago in Spain you would not see 20 year old bands playing festivals and all, so things have really changed.


Lyrics...what do you want your fans to get out of your stories? How do want them to feel?

I think there is a whole concept about the lyrics. First the songs come, then the lyrics so the lyrics are feeding off the songs. We put a lot of thought into them, there is more emphasis on lyrics now in Spain then maybe 10 years ago. We're trying to find what we want to say. We grew up with lyrics not being a big thing the rock scene, but we know it is a thing that fans like. We're trying to use all of our input so our songs are shared between all of us.

baywaves | photo cred: gigsoupmusic.com

baywaves | photo cred: gigsoupmusic.com



Lets talk about your live show. How do you get the crowd going, what is your mission when you take the stage?

After we started playing festivals and releasing the first EP and playing more shows. We knew we had to change things in our live show because before we were only playing once a month. Not only were we recording new songs, but we were really focused on how to incorporate new things.

The rhythmic thing was big with us. Different textures and all. We don't play that many songs live at the moment. Maybe 5 songs in 30 minutes. So yea, we are trying to get into a rhythm and not just be 4 guys jerking around on stage. We want fans to be able to move around and dance, but also be amazed at what we are doing.


I always use funny metaphors to describe bands and artists i write about, what would you use?

A long time ago the one the said was "suave" which is soft in spanish, but I think it has changed since then. Hmmm, we have to think about this one.

You know the moment you are going to fall onto a couch, or something soft, that moment you are in mid-air. For me, that would probably be it.

me: You all provide a soft landing for everyone, I get that. What kind of couch am I falling on?

One that is big enough to lay down on.

 

suggested listening experience: afternoon hang with friends // cruising in the city // beach/sunny hangs

listens: time is passing u by // gliss // down 4 u // still in bed // the freak kingdom // to the north

bw - spotify // fb // twitter // ig // sc

Dance Punk Aussie Shredders DZ Deathrays

reppin: brisbane, australia // i oh you records // 2008 - present

dz deathrays | photo cred: themusic.com.au

dz deathrays | photo cred: themusic.com.au

sounds like: a can of beer after you shake it up and are just about to open it

last album drop: bloody lovely (feb 2018)

featuring: shane // simon

Classify these guys as you will, but one thing is certain, they can fucking rock. DZ Deathrays comes by way of Australia, like most of the good stuff these days, and they meet in the middle of rock, punk, metal and dance. Yes, dance. There tunes crawl inside you like an adrenaline rush and the only way to let it take you over is to really dance. The rhythm and pace of their music really does set it up for a dance party. I had the pleasure of catching these dudes at Schubas a few summers ago for one of there very few America stints.

Shane and Simon have been shredding riffs together for the past 10 years and have given us humans a few EPs and LPs in the process. In the land of Brisbane, they started as the band Velociraptor (sweet word), but quickly morphed into DZ Deathrays by playing house parties around town starting in 2008. It wasn’t long after, “Bloodstreams,” their first full length, was received crazy good and even racked in an AIRA. It is so freaking catchy. Your Dad will listen to it and wake up the next day with a mohawk and tight jeans (because we all know we want our dads to do just that). Since then they have been touring legends, hitting over 15 countries on this tiny green and blue marble, playing countless festivals and bringing raging fun times to hundreds of thousands of fans.

I know it was a Monday when they played the tiny Chicago venue and there wasn’t a huge turnout, but the dudes did not disappoint. It doesn’t matter how many people are in the room when they play, they rock out and rock out hard.

Just a short month ago (because February is 28 days, why? Someone tell me), they released their latest full length, Bloody Lovely. The sounds spans a few decades of rock, with easy to move to music and singing ready choruses. I’d start with the opening track banger, “Shred For Summer,” which has shades of Led Zeppelin and you can immediately get a sense for how impactful and easy on the ears the vocals are. The whole album is pretty high octane, but you can also slow it down with “Over It.” Enjoy the little chat I got to have with Shane and Simon!

dz deathrays | schubas, chicago | 7.18.16 | @thefaakehipster

dz deathrays | schubas, chicago | 7.18.16 | @thefaakehipster

 

interview stuff

How did the journey start for y'all and how did you all learn to work together and land on your sound?

We started as a 3 piece but our drummer shortly left to move overseas so I moved onto drums and Shane and I kept the band as a 2 piece and changed the name. Initially we just wanted to play at our friends house parties but eventually we started getting offers for club shows and it just kinda went from there.

 

When you look at your lives and the story you want to tell, how do you want new fans to approach and interpret your lyrics?

dz deathrays | schubas, chicago | 7.18.16 | @thefaakehipster

dz deathrays | schubas, chicago | 7.18.16 | @thefaakehipster

Shane doesn't really class himself as an in depth lyricist and that most of the songs come from personal experiences and or stories his read. He just wants people to take away what they want.

 

Talk to me about songwriting...how does an idea birth and in what ways to you run with it to create a track?

We've kinda changed the technique a bit over the years as we live in different cities now. However usually one of us will have a riff or maybe a beat and then we just email it back and forth adding to it from our homes. Once we have a few demo's near completion we'll all try to get a house or rehearsal room somewhere and then try play the songs as a band and see where it takes us.

 

What is your mission when you take the stage. What do you want people to feel?

We want everyone to just lose all inhibitions and just have a fun wild night.  We try to make it feel like one big party where almost anything goes and hope that everyone leaves with smile and fun story to tell their friends.

 

I often love using humorous metaphors to describe artist and band's identity and sound. What is DZ's metaphor?

I guess its more of a moto, but we always say: "Set the bar low and you'll always surpass it."

 

suggested listening experience: rocking out on the weekends // party time central // outdoor summer hangs

listens: shred for summer // total meltdown // dollar chills // pollyanna // like people // blood on my leather // feeling good, feeling great // less out of sync

dzd // spotify // fb // twitter // sc // ig

Wild Pink Makes Dreamy Power Pop For All

reppin: queens & brooklyn, usa // tiny engines // 2015 - present

sounds like: the 2002 oakland a’s but for music (referencing the team from the movie, Moneyball staring the handsome Brad Pitt)

last album drop: wild pink (feb 2017)

featuring: john // tc // dan

wild pink | source: wildpink.bandcamp.com

wild pink | source: wildpink.bandcamp.com

In the boroughs of New York, Wild Pink was once upon a time ago a electronic pop group called Challenger. At some point they said fuck it, stripped the electronic and got a bit more power poppy and shoegazey. After a few EPs in 2015, they quickly took notice of some smaller indie labels and have been touring like crazy to get their name out there. Some would call it a “mid-fi” sound because it is the middle something. Maybe? Either way, these dudes give you a lovely sort of vibe as if you are floating down the river in a kayak and then bam, time to handle those rapids in front of you. Whatever you come up with, John, TC and Dan have channeled their inner 90s alternative/indie sound with a modern twist that keeps your ears peaked.

Wild Pink is full of energy and for every darker moment in their music that comes across, you are kind of followed with this warm and cuddly one. It is this cycle that keeps you intrigued and wanting to find out what story they will tell next. I love how John’s voice meshes with the music as it is super mellow and fitting for the constant push and pull they give you. And that voice puts out some lyrics that make you think as they offer thoughts and experiences on love and life.

I had the chance to catch them at Chicago’s Empty Bottle to a decent size crowd on a cold night this past week. These guys do little talking as they let their instruments speak throughout their set. Their simple setup mimics their vibe as they want to give it to their audience straight with the simple goal of just enjoying yourself. Whether that gets you moving on your feet or you find yourself staring into space thinking about how this music impacts you, you leave feeling rewarded. I had a few minutes to get some one liner responses to a few questions. Catch them next time they are in your city.

interview stuff

IMG_20180223_162105_437.jpg

Y’all have been a group for only a few short years. What do you attribute to finding your groove and your sound?

TC and I have been playing together since 2014. Dan started playing with us in 2016 and that's when things started to click.

When you are playing live, what is your mission? When you make eye contact with that fan out there, what do you want them to experience?

I hope people watching enjoy themselves! That's the mission..

What do you want people to get out of your lyrics? Has there been a defined path to how you want those to take in the words and stories?

If the lyrics resonate with someone then that's really awesome. I want people to interpret the words how they wish.

Do you have any corky rituals for pre/post show?

I drink Malort when we're in Chicago

I like to use funny metaphors to describe bands and artists i write about, what would you use?

We're the 2002 Oakland A's but for music.

suggested listening experience: mellow weekday night with a few brews // long road trips // convincing friends who only listen to 90s music to branch out a bit

listens: wizard of loneliness // great apes // how do you know if god takes you back // broke on // albert ross

wp // spotify // fb // twitter // ig // sc

Missio: Darkness With Underlying Beauty

reppin: austin, tx // rca records // 2014 - present

sounds like: walking through the drug part of heaven (according to david)

last album drop: loner (may 2017)

featuring: matt // david

missio | outside lincoln hall, chicago | 10.25.17 | @thefaakehipster

missio | outside lincoln hall, chicago | 10.25.17 | @thefaakehipster

The one overlaying theme that I truly believe almost all artist, musicians, songwriters and any creatives are out there to do is to make us humans feel something. To supply genuine art that we can consume and let it seep into our skin and actually affect us in some way. Make us fucking feel something. I've grown up all my life listening to music, ever since I went and purchased "dookie," "sublime," "the colour and the shape," and "licensed to ill" at best buy when I was maybe 9 years old. I didn't know it at the time, but I loved music because it could make me feel something. Even at that age, something as simple as dancing or singing along to an album brought joy. I had yet to encompass the teenage angst that my tight skinny jeans screamed out when I got to high school. So I guess you could say, I let those sounds and lyrics seep in.

Missio is a duo out of one of the music capitals of the country. In just a few short years and putting out a hell of a debut album, these two guys are on a fucking mission to do more. These two guys, matt brue and david butler, have such care for their craft and dreams that involve more of you, the listener. As someone who is trying to bring new music to the general music listener, I want to share the experience of allowing yourself to feel something when you listen to music. To strip yourself down and give a shit about what is coming into your ears. I'm a believer and advocate of it because it is one of the best feelings in the world. When Cait and I sat down with matt and david, there as an immediate calmness and chill that allowed all of us to open up. Not only do I love the music that Missio creates, as well as having a good feeling that there are big things to come for them...I a million percent respect and appreciate the detail to what these guys are setting out to do: and that is to make your hearts and mind feel things you may not have felt before.

Check out our little chat and don't forget y'all, they are on tour again and coming to chicago.

missio spring tour 2018 // bottom lounge chicago feb 25 - tickets (sold out)

interview stuff

jared: After checking you guys out in Austin at SXSW and Lolla, we are stoked to talk to y'all about the journey and how you came to be.

Let’s talk about the journey since you two joined forces? I love this soothing, almost big rock sound. What have you learned about yourselves individually and as a band as it relates to the sound you want to create? Also, what is the process to your songwriting?

matt: I was very anti working with people period for a long, long time. I never had a good experience. Everyone had different opinions of what they wanted to do and nothing really fully aligned. The relationship going on with David was dude, I just want you to produce this record. And then we started working together and I was like, holy shit, somebody else actually kind of has the same vision as I do and not squashing ideas all the time. It was a really good learning moment for me. Collaboration can actually make the art better in so many ways. And that has happened multiple times now, even with filmmakers. It def was a little bit of loosening up and just finding a match to make these things happen.

missio | lincoln hall, chicago | 10.25.17 | @thefaakehipster

missio | lincoln hall, chicago | 10.25.17 | @thefaakehipster

david: i think that question is one of the hardest any artist can ever figure out. You have to constantly keep answering. You can't just simplify it by saying, "listen to other people." I've played in bands before when everyone is coming from different perspective. There were fundamental creative differences. It is about finding people that share your vision. I know lots of great songwriters I would never write with. But I was drawn to Matt because of what he was doing. My whole thing as a producer from day 1 has been to jump in the boat with someone, swallow your ego and pride and lets make the best thing we can together. Not just it is the first thing that came to mind. It works because we have the same end goal. The other unique thing about us is honesty. Matt has thick skin and I do too. We can say things and move on. Sorry I'm gushing on this, it's just a great thing to talk about. We were in a cab in NYC talking about this and he said "you have to learn when to fight for your ideas. You can't fight for every single idea. Knowing when to stand up and trust your instincts and when to let it go."

Collaboration can actually make the art better in so many ways.

matt: There is a lot of times when our producer will go down this rabbit hole and I'm thinking this is so stupid. And then slowly I see the idea come to life and I'm like, okay I can feel it.

david: we had a co-writing session a few months back and let's just say it got off to a rocky start. We had never met the dude. This was reallll shady and all, we couldn't hold a conversation with him. My personality is I'm going to make you comfortable and keep working. Matt is more like, "fuck this." (laughs). Matt is checked out, I go through the motions and we ended up writing a dope song. We def learned from that...let things go, don't be too judgmental. The song hasn't been released, but you will know! It could def be the single.

jared: do you have a name for it yet?

both: can't tell you!

 

I love the meaning behind your songs...kinda camouflage. What do you want your fans to take away from it.

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matt: that's a good question. I think first, you have to write from experience and what you I am feeling. When you start writing for other people it can be a little bit dangerous because it can come across an disingenuous. So, that is the first step for me, for myself to be able to resonate and relate to the lyrics. People can read through the bullshit. If I am every night, singing a song, I don't even care about you, I want to go back to that time, what I felt when I wrote that song. The audience can be like, I get and feel what he is saying. I believe it, so it is hitting me in a different way. And second, I think both of our goals in music, similar to our song, kamikazee, "I want money and power / And champagne and fame / I want money and power / My black heart's to blame." I want more so than all that stuff is for people to helped. With a lyric like, "thank god for the haters, those bitches inspire me." I want people to feel comfortable to be like, "yea, fuck the haters."

david: i'm going to give you a bit more of an abstract answer. I think I really want people to listen to music with the mind I listened to music when I was growing up. It is a lot harder now being in the music business. It is easy to marginalize and minimize what song someone is trying to write. Confession: I tend to minimize someone's art until it wins me over. I hate that, but I think that is the music culture we live in. People consume music and don't really let it affect their lives like they could. Music is art. I've had so many instances where music has changed my life. Those moments are what inspire me to be a musician and song writer. I think about growing up and listening to songs and lyrics and having real emotional moments. They really helped me through a time in my life. Or in another way, I understood. Ultimately that is my goal with Missio and in general. This is how I see the world, here is a feeling that I have had. And maybe you feel that too. I want people to listen to music, period. There is so much shitty music which has no deeper meaning. No one sits down and puts on a record and listens to it anymore. Very few do. Give yourself an opportunity to fully experience music.

jared: you pretty much hit exactly what I am trying to do.

People consume music and don’t really let it affect their lives like they could. Music is art

 

What is your mission when you take the stage. What do you want people to feel?

matt: my ultimate goal with the live show is that people who come from busy lives, spend $20 on a show, they want to get out of their reality for a few hours. If you go up there and do a half ass job you're not really doing that much to help them. So, for us, and for any artist our goal is to be that filler for a few hours. Put your fucking A game on. Whether it is production, getting ready vocally, you want to put on the best performance possible. You want to let them experience different kinds of emotions. We are aggressive, we want them to feel that. And then songs like "bottom of the deep blue sea" which are more cinematic. Then "twisted" which is really fucked up and having them feel that. 

david: i used to be envious of bands in the 70s because a live show then had to be so much more overwhelming compared to the recorded quality they had at the time. It was a different experience. The further back you go, the more wild they are. But, one interesting thing about now is that there are few times were people are fully engaged somewhere, and that includes at a live show. One of my goals is to have a full sensory experience, lights has been a part of our thing from day one. I want to bring a full, emersive experience to them and make it communal. Hopefully they are singing and moving along with us. Everything matters to us and we want it to be authentic. Then you create this cycle between the audience and the stage.

 

If you had to use a metaphor to describe your sound and identity, what would it be?

Darkness underlying beauty.

david: walking through the drug part of heaven for sure. That just came to mind actually. If heaven had a really dark spot. Darkness underlying beauty.

 

suggested listening experience: getting close to your significant other // when you are angry and tired after a day of work // saturday night shenanigans

listens: middle fingers // everybody gets high // bottom of the deep blue sea // kamikazee // twisted // west coast (lana del ray cover)

missio // fb // spotify // ig // twitter // sc 

Black Pistol Fire - Rock N' Roll Cheese Eating Friends Since Kindergarten

reppin: austin, usa by way of canada // modern outsider // 2014 - present

sounds like: a sizzling plate of delicious cheese aka saganaki

last album drop: “deadbeat graffiti” (sept 2017)

featuring: eric // kevin

jared (left) hanging with eric (center) and kevin (right) during the black pistol fire interview | riot fest, 2017 | chicago |@thefaakehipster

jared (left) hanging with eric (center) and kevin (right) during the black pistol fire interview | riot fest, 2017 | chicago |@thefaakehipster

Lou Reed once said he would die for rock n’ roll because it is something so beautiful that you can feel. When I look at this genre, I couldn't agree more with the emotional connection that us humans can have with such an energetic sound. The raw and blistering guitar riffs and solos, lyrics about angst, love, life, death and everything in between. The audience, the atmosphere that can be created outdoor at festivals and inside at sweaty rock clubs. We individually become one and as one we can forget about the daily bullshit life brings us. Every genre of music, every type of melody and lyric and every type of musician and band can bring us all the good things in the world because music stands alone like that. With Black Pistol Fire, they bring all the rock and all the emotion for us to enjoy live.

Black Pistol Fire is described as high octane and that could very much be an understatement. Two dudes take the stage and then they start playing their instruments and you are like, “holy shit, how are these two guys making so much awesome noise together.” It really is a site to see Eric and Kevin really vibing off each other, the audience and just going balls to wall in their performance. You can tell they are having just as much fun as everyone watching them. Kevin will use the whole stage as he swings his guitar around with him and Eric pretty much beats the shit out his drums...oh those poor drums.

black pistol fire | bottom lounge, chicago | 12.7.17

black pistol fire | bottom lounge, chicago | 12.7.17

Cait and I had a chance to kick it with these cheese eating chill dudes after their stellar Riot Fest set. They really are just normal dudes with just enough weird in them that know how to play their instruments really well. Read away kids:

 

the interview

How did you guys meet and what past experiences attribute to you all making the music you do?

kevin: Well we actually met in kindergarten believe it or not in Toronto at a very young age. We were always very clsoe and all. We didn't really play music until we were in high school. Playing a lot of Nirvana, Oasis, Beatles and Weezer covers. Then we discovered Zeppelin and our whole world change.

me: it's crazy how times like that happen, you hear a band or a era of music and boom, your whole taste of music starts to expand.

kevin: Yea I was in a Zeppelin phase for like a year and wasn't really paying attention to everything else, I should have been. But it all came around for me once I started listening to more.

eric: I think the first real rock band I got into was Silverchair actually. You know also though, my parents listened to Bob Dylan, the Beatles, Chuck Berry. I was obsseded with that music.

me: So how did all of that land on Black Pistol.

kevin: I think when you hear us live you can tell I am coming from one area and Eric is coming from another. But we are both attacking at the same time with the same intensity.

 

So as you portray that on-stage, we literally were talking about how you are able to sound like more than two people.

black pistol fire interview | riot fest, 2017 | chicago |@thefaakehipster

black pistol fire interview | riot fest, 2017 | chicago |@thefaakehipster

kevin: You know I think everyone attacks it differently. You know we don't want to overplay, but raising the stakes. We definetly try to put out a lot of energy. We spend time with arrangements, rehearsing, how our dynamics are going to works on stage. The idea is that one part is high and loud and maybe the other is lower and quieter. A little of this is confusing people and having a natural build to the show so it isn't the same thing over and over. You have to hone that in and take advantage. Also, playing every single song like it's your last.

me: That has to be exhausting...but so rewarding.

No amount of cheese is ever too much cheese.

eric: Oh yea, for sure. I mean if you love what you do, you can beat the hell out of yourself and it doesn't really matter.

kevin: I know after shows we are so taxed, but the adrenaline rush is still there, you can't sleep or anything. It is a weird kind of feeling. One of our routines when we get off-stage, we like to take a big brick of cheddar cheese and just finish it off in about 15 minutes.

me: hahah. No amount of cheese is ever too much cheese. That is great.

kevin: It wears you out actually so you can sleep.

me: So eating a brick of cheese is as exhausting as the performance?

everyone: Yea!

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We are very big on lyrics and I am curious what the writing process is and how you want fans to react to it.

kevin: So for me, the music always comes first. I write something I really feeling and all and then the lyrics dictate the music and it's a merging of the two kind of. Sometimes I'll even look back at the lyrics later on and be like, huh, I think I know where I was at during that point. Maybe I was getting dark, maybe I was getting sassy. I don't think I ever sit down and say I am going to write a break up song or love song. I think you always leave room to see where it goes. The music sometimes evokes whatever emotion and words you are feeling at the time.

eric: I mean we always take lines too and if it doesn't work in one song, it can work in another. Spare puzzles.

kevin: Yea, sometimes we have that one lyric and hook.

I write something I really feeling and all and then the lyrics dictate the music and it’s a merging of the two kind of.

 

With all of that coming together, how do you guys challenge yourselves to evolve?

eric: I think the big thing is different genres of music are part of it. The new album that is coming out is a lot of different stuff and some stuff that we have never tried before. We listen to a ton of different music so you kind of say, how do you make your version of a hip hop song. I can elements from this genre and that one and try to fuse them together,

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kevin: Yea, we are constantly working in the studio, rehearsing and writing. It is always going. This new album coming out is the reflection of listening habits. I'm a big fan of albums in the world of playlists. But I like how an album can hop around with different types of sounds.

eric: We definitely want to change it up with speeds.

me: Yea I get that. I want to hear all the music, see all these bands and artists live so it can come back full circle and give me an understanding of the roots of my favorite music and everything else.

 

If you had to choose a metaphor to describe your sound and image, what would it be?

eric: Damn, that is a hard question.

kevin: Imagine doing a lot of blow then balancing it out with some booze. A booze filled 8-ball.

cait: Then eating some cheese!

kevin: Something that sizzles...

me: Saganaki!

kevin: Yes! We are a sizzling plate of delicious cheese.

 

suggested listening experience: outdoor summer night parties // getting amped up for the day // enjoying some sweet love making

listens: suffocation blues // hipster shakes // fleet foot // lost cause // beelzebub // where you been before

bpf // spotify // ig // twitter // fb