Dance Punk Aussie Shredders DZ Deathrays

reppin: brisbane, australia // i oh you records // 2008 - present

dz deathrays | photo cred: themusic.com.au

dz deathrays | photo cred: themusic.com.au

sounds like: a can of beer after you shake it up and are just about to open it

last album drop: bloody lovely (feb 2018)

featuring: shane // simon

Classify these guys as you will, but one thing is certain, they can fucking rock. DZ Deathrays comes by way of Australia, like most of the good stuff these days, and they meet in the middle of rock, punk, metal and dance. Yes, dance. There tunes crawl inside you like an adrenaline rush and the only way to let it take you over is to really dance. The rhythm and pace of their music really does set it up for a dance party. I had the pleasure of catching these dudes at Schubas a few summers ago for one of there very few America stints.

Shane and Simon have been shredding riffs together for the past 10 years and have given us humans a few EPs and LPs in the process. In the land of Brisbane, they started as the band Velociraptor (sweet word), but quickly morphed into DZ Deathrays by playing house parties around town starting in 2008. It wasn’t long after, “Bloodstreams,” their first full length, was received crazy good and even racked in an AIRA. It is so freaking catchy. Your Dad will listen to it and wake up the next day with a mohawk and tight jeans (because we all know we want our dads to do just that). Since then they have been touring legends, hitting over 15 countries on this tiny green and blue marble, playing countless festivals and bringing raging fun times to hundreds of thousands of fans.

I know it was a Monday when they played the tiny Chicago venue and there wasn’t a huge turnout, but the dudes did not disappoint. It doesn’t matter how many people are in the room when they play, they rock out and rock out hard.

Just a short month ago (because February is 28 days, why? Someone tell me), they released their latest full length, Bloody Lovely. The sounds spans a few decades of rock, with easy to move to music and singing ready choruses. I’d start with the opening track banger, “Shred For Summer,” which has shades of Led Zeppelin and you can immediately get a sense for how impactful and easy on the ears the vocals are. The whole album is pretty high octane, but you can also slow it down with “Over It.” Enjoy the little chat I got to have with Shane and Simon!

dz deathrays | schubas, chicago | 7.18.16 | @thefaakehipster

dz deathrays | schubas, chicago | 7.18.16 | @thefaakehipster

 

interview stuff

How did the journey start for y'all and how did you all learn to work together and land on your sound?

We started as a 3 piece but our drummer shortly left to move overseas so I moved onto drums and Shane and I kept the band as a 2 piece and changed the name. Initially we just wanted to play at our friends house parties but eventually we started getting offers for club shows and it just kinda went from there.

 

When you look at your lives and the story you want to tell, how do you want new fans to approach and interpret your lyrics?

dz deathrays | schubas, chicago | 7.18.16 | @thefaakehipster

dz deathrays | schubas, chicago | 7.18.16 | @thefaakehipster

Shane doesn't really class himself as an in depth lyricist and that most of the songs come from personal experiences and or stories his read. He just wants people to take away what they want.

 

Talk to me about songwriting...how does an idea birth and in what ways to you run with it to create a track?

We've kinda changed the technique a bit over the years as we live in different cities now. However usually one of us will have a riff or maybe a beat and then we just email it back and forth adding to it from our homes. Once we have a few demo's near completion we'll all try to get a house or rehearsal room somewhere and then try play the songs as a band and see where it takes us.

 

What is your mission when you take the stage. What do you want people to feel?

We want everyone to just lose all inhibitions and just have a fun wild night.  We try to make it feel like one big party where almost anything goes and hope that everyone leaves with smile and fun story to tell their friends.

 

I often love using humorous metaphors to describe artist and band's identity and sound. What is DZ's metaphor?

I guess its more of a moto, but we always say: "Set the bar low and you'll always surpass it."

 

suggested listening experience: rocking out on the weekends // party time central // outdoor summer hangs

listens: shred for summer // total meltdown // dollar chills // pollyanna // like people // blood on my leather // feeling good, feeling great // less out of sync

dzd // spotify // fb // twitter // sc // ig

interview stuff: SURFER BLOOD

reppin: west palm beach, fl // joyful noise records // 2009 - present

sounds like: according to John Paul Pitts (JPP) - a dog chasing its tail, pure joy, a bit goofy..I’m going to catch that tail.

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

last album drop: snowdonia (feb, 2017)

featuring: john (lead vocals/guitar) // mike (guitar) // lindsey (bass) // tyler (drums)

Not so often does a band come across your ears that gives you a sense of calm no matter what the situation or headspace you are in. Maybe you are floating in the clouds and want to tell everyone about that new significant other or you had a shit day and you hate everyone. Flick over to Surfer Blood on your select music service and pop in your buds. JPP's soft and soothing vocals will bring you to write space. Mike’s simple guitar riffs and pleasant solos will lift your spirits. Lindsey’s running bass line will keep your head moving back and forth. Finally, the drums will bring it all together.  These kids hail from West Palm Beach and you can feel the ocean almost as you flip through their albums.

My favorite thing about these kids is that they are constantly teetering back and forth between a harder punk sound and a lighter flow of indie rock. It’s pretty special when a band can widen the spectrum and bring different feels to you with each song. There is overwhelming respect for them as well. While they played musical chairs with some band members for a bit, one of their dear friends, Thomas Fekete, passed away from cancer last year. It can really put some perspective on life and what you are trying to accomplish as a band.

These non-stop road hustlers have been making music for quite some time. They’ve played alongside the likes of Broken Social Scene, The Walkman, The Pixies and more. On top of that, their albums have constantly been hitting the top 200 on the US charts and show no sign of slowing down. As I got to interview frontman JPP, I came to realize the humility and love for playing music he has. Simply wanting to be part of the music scene is something pretty special.

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

INTERVIEW STUFF

You’ve been at it for almost 10 years, sorry to make you feel old, but I love your take on just constantly chugging out new records and touring. That concept, how does it help you find your sound and identity?

The reason we all got into this wasn’t to get rich or anything...it is more about making memories and having crazy experiences together. I turned 30 last year and I was looking back at my 20s and realizing I wouldn't trade it for anything. Traveling opens your mind, learn a lot. you meet a lot of interesting people and that certainly contributes to how we make music. We always want to stay consistent and to stay busy. All my favorite artists growing up were constantly putting out music and it is good to be one of those bands. We tour all the time and haven’t taken much time off in 7 years. It is a big world and there are lots of places to play and it keeps us really busy.

Jared: I really appreciate that. As a music fan, when a band always wants to be out on the road, be with their fans and constantly make music...that is when I see bands that are level with their audience. As a band, I can totally see how that sort of connection and communication can help you grow musically. There is something about really holding onto the individual.

Yea, I think we are one of the more acceptable bands around. It is just the four of us, We drive ourselves, we sell our own merch after the shows. We talk to people and sign stuff for them and while it is tiring to do that whole DIY approach, it is probably more fulfilling. We’ve been in situations before where people would sell our merch and schlep our gear and it felt weird.

Speaking of constantly touring, how do you channel your identity to the live stage. When you make eye contact with that fan or are warming up a room, what do you want people to feel?

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

surfer blood | lincoln hall, chicago | 6.17.17 | @thefaakehipster

That’s a good question. I guess, when you go to see a band and your favorite song plays and you feel that rush of energy. I want people to have a good time. We’ve played stuff from every one of our releases and we have a ton of material...over 40 songs now. I’m very proud of the fact that the albums are all different from each other. There are your 3 minute pop songs and your longer moody songs. Hopefully people get to have that feeling of hearing their favorite song. Also, maybe get exposed to some new stuff that they really haven’t listened to yet. Something old, something new.

Your lyrics where do you draw inspiration from and how ...You’ve experienced of some band members switching out, medical conditions, how does that affect you personally and help you grow as an individual and band?

For one, it builds character. Going through all this stuff gives you some really great perspective as a band. You are constantly playing these shows, you are tired. I think seeing everything that Thomas went through gives you an appreciation for being alive and doing whatever you want. Thomas came from a family of musicians and music was always something very sacred to him. That is something I always try to keep in mind all the time, even when I am tired and want to go home. Doing something like this is so precious, so fragile.

Jared: Does that appreciation and experiences channel through into your lyrics?

It does man. I never sit down and say I am going to write a song about this. A lot of times, when I am done writing a batch of songs, I’ve really figured out what is going on in my head. You know what I mean. It is hard to keep tabs on it sometimes. If anything, writing is quickest way to sort that all out. How could it not come through, you know.

The fact is people go through their lives and never reflect or think it’s necessary. I feel like it totally is. I’m a more sane person, I have a clear idea of where I am.

I always use funny metaphors to describe bands and artists i write about, what would you use?

A dog chasing its tail - pure joy, a bit goofy...I’m going to catch that tail. (He came out firing right away with that answer)

suggested listening experience: hanging in your backyard with your best buds // cruising down the highway with the windows down // getting your day started

listens: matter of time // floating vibes // demon dance // prom song // frozen // anchorage // six flag in F or G // swim

sb // spotify // fb // twitter // ig // sc

interview stuff: L.A. WITCH

reppin: la, usa // suicide squeeze records // 2013 - present

sounds like: according to them (and Holy Wave): "we are a spider eating other baby spiders in a cave deep in the forest and there is a motorcycle driving off in the distance"

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

next album drop: L.A. Witch (debut out September 8th) PRE-ORDER HERE

featuring: sade // irita // ellie

Think about your week so far...how many instances have you had where you just wanted to say “fuck off” or you needed a moment to just shake off the anger, the stress and the typical bullshit of daily life. I dig tunes that can speak to certain aspects of life. The rad, rocker chicks that are Sade, Irita and Ellie have tunes for you so you can chew up and spit out whatever it is that you can’t shake off. This beautiful kick in the throat that spills from their amps and drums is a blender of garage and psychedelic rock with a sprinkle of punk and reverb. They will throw you back to the 60s and will literally make you think of dark, deep witches.

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

What began as a few friends meeting in high school turned into a band around 2013 and blossomed into something special. As we got to kick it on a rainy, early summer night, I could notice the calm over them as well as the chemistry that has built them into road warriors. They really have been a tight knit group for some years now and are ready to make some noise with their new record, which you can pre-order HERE. Hailing from LA, it is hard for bands to stand out above the crowd, but these ladies are quickly rising above the clutter. While stuff can happen quick and fast, I don’t detect any sort of fear in these ones.

After we sat down for the interview we got to kick it through the night with their good friends, Holy Wave, and the fun carried over. Beers, shots, perhaps a special delivery of greenery complements of my brother went down and it was the perfect lead up to their set. They don’t need to talk much as they take the dimly lit stage. They move through each song swiftly and you can tell they are focused on one another, in the zone if you will. When they go into their solos, you literally can just lay back and not give a shit since the instruments take you to this dream like state. The riffs are powerful and the vocals are deep, dark and delightful. As the set rolls through the crowd engagement picks up and the feels settle amongst the venue. You need to catch these kids live.

As for the interview, check out how they discovered their sound, why they write the lyrics they do and how they try to channel that into their live show. I should note that things started off on a great note before I even got to ask a questions we talked about the past few weeks...a few quotes:

“She just ate an edible the other day and that killed her.”

“In Austin we took some acid and it was like really strong. We were told, take 2 of these and be careful...it’s been a pretty fun tour so far.”

INTERVIEW STUFF

Simply put, your music takes me to a “i don’t give a fuck” space...everyone needs a i don't give a fuck moment everyday. Is that something you try to do with your sound. What do you want to get out of that fan listening to you?

Sade: We want our fans to feel inspired and take whatever they want and can from our songs. If they want to interpret songs to cater to their needs, then that is what we want. It is for everyone to listen to.It is always really cool to hear people say they started bands because they saw us or we make them want to pick up an instrument again or work harder at one. Even the people who do not plan on playing music. If you can find a connection that makes you stronger, then that is cool.

Let’s talk lyrics. They are super relatable and really left open ended, like sometimes, what the fuck are you talking about? “Save me from myself” is something that sticks out...Are there any moments as a band or before you became a band that led to this theme and foundation?

Sade: I mean, wait, I forgot the question (laughs)

It all happens way more spontaneous. We don’t really plan it out, you know. We’ll come together, maybe bring a piece of a song or lyric to the table and we’ll all sit and work on it...then it forms into something. For this upcoming album, it wasn’t really anything that was planned. There was no song on there that was, wait, this is going to be atheme. It was all very naturally put together, what we were building as we went through and wrote. In the future that may not exactly be how it is, the lyrics may be more complex. For what we have right now, we have that whatever happens kind of vibe.

That same “fuck you” idea...your tracks give me a sense of relatability. How do you channel that into your live show? What is going thru your mind as you are making eye contact with that one human out there?

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

l.a. witch | schubas, chicago | 5.10.17 | @thefaakehipster

Ellie: As a drummer...I just want them to feel like they are on the same page as us...raw emotion.

Sade: Yea I agree with ...I want them to feel what we feel as much as possible. We don’t exactly focus too much on the audience, it is not like we are ignoring them, but by connecting with each other on stage, we are being as honest as we can as a band. Even if that means we have to feel like we are in our own little bubble, that is for the fans. It is really scary to perform and throw yourself out there, so we are still learning to work with the audience and see what different ways we can connect with them.

I always use funny metaphors to describe bands and artists i write about, what would you use?

We are a spider eating other baby spiders in a cave deep in the forest and there is a motorcycle driving off in the distance

suggested listening experience: twist, smoke and chill // road tripping // on the ride home after a long day

listens: kill my baby tonight // untitled // get lost // heart of darkness // haunting

lw // spotify // fb // twitter // sc // ig

interview stuff: DUDE YORK

reppin: seattle, wa // 2009 - present // sub pop records

sounds like: karaoke with your friends....(see last question)

dude york | cobra lounge, chicago | 4.1.17 | @thefaakehipster

dude york | cobra lounge, chicago | 4.1.17 | @thefaakehipster

latest album drop: sincerely (feb, 2017)

featuring: andrew (drums) // claire (bass) // peter (guitar)

The other month I had the treat of sitting down with punk rock trio, Dude York, straight out of Seattle and signed to the legendary Sub-Pop records. Having been rocking out for nearly 10 years at this point, their latest release, Sincerely, is a bouncy rock record that spans the spectrum of the genre. The simple approach, powerful riffs and comfy sound really allow you to reach in and use their tracks as your own motivation. Life sucks sometimes, but there is no way to avoid that. Suck that shit up, roll up your sleeves and prove to yourself that you can handle it. We have our family, our friends and the ability to look within and bring out our highest potential. Music is powerful.

Interview Stuff

The new record punches you in the face with just about every sliver of rock one can think of...was it a matter of channeling your inner rock or trying to appeal to more of the masses? I really don’t hear a lot of records like this, that span the range like y’all and it kind of gives everyone something to like.

Andrew: That is really cool, thanks man.

dude york | cobra lounge, chicago | 4.1.17 | @thefaakehipster

dude york | cobra lounge, chicago | 4.1.17 | @thefaakehipster

Claire: I think from a genre standpoint, it was pretty natural to us. We weren’t exactly going for what you are saying in particular, but it definitely was all of us coming together on this different sounds of rock. It wasn’t on purpose. We got into the studio and we're just trying to write and this is the path we went down.

Peter: I def want to reiterate that, We’re not really interested in any genres, it’s about the songs. There is definitely some intentionally and adventure to it.

Jared (Me): You come together and write and this is what you pooped out kinda.

P: I mean yea, there is a bit more intentionality than that, but pretty much.

J: I did not mean to compare pooping to the writing your record, I’m just weird like that. Experiencing one another and vibing together has gotten you to this point.

P: (Laughs). I am glad you cleared up. The human chemistry element has definitely has dictated the sound more than it is the preferences of the members in the band and what we like.

I really appreciate the attention to detail with you lyrics and focus on what this record means to you, what it’s about. What do you want your fans to get out of it regarding the lyrics, the story?

P: It is a record that is predominately focused on grief, circumventing our recovery conundrum. I think in order to that you have to start by building your own triumphs and simulating that  into experiencing victory in the real world. Plan it out and build it for yourself. A lot of these songs kinda channel that, at least the ones I’m singing on.

C: I did write the songs I sing on and it was my first time singing with Dude York, but I like to leave my lyrics open to interpretation more. I think that is a cool thing to push. As time goes on in my life that song can have a different meaning to me and even someone else. You know we all go through changes so I feel like my writing should mimic that to an extent.

dude york | cobra lounge, chicago | 4.1.17 | @thefaakehipster

dude york | cobra lounge, chicago | 4.1.17 | @thefaakehipster

A: They kinda covered everything. I really like the fact that songs have the ability to get interpreted in so many different ways. What you necessarily bring to the table is not exactly what is taken away. And then you talk to people what they hear in songs and sometimes you get to go, holy shit, I never thought about it that way, but that is amazing.

dude york | cobra lounge, chicago | 4.1.17 | @thefaakehipster

dude york | cobra lounge, chicago | 4.1.17 | @thefaakehipster

C: Sometimes it is even just misheard lyrics are fun too...yea that would have been great!

A: Misheard lyrics are awesome (laughs)

J: (laughs - I always laugh) I always appreciate when musicians leave lyrics open to interpretation and I can’t tell you how many times I’ll listen to a song 10 years later and it will mean something completely different to me. Sometimes those feels constantly change through those 10 years as well.

A: This will make me sounds weird, but speaking of those bands from back in the day, Elvis Costello though, I probably took the most from in high school. Really intense records I did not really understand at the moment for me in Idaho, in the middle of nowhere not having a clue when I was 16 years old. It really wasn’t until later on in life that I finally got it. And it is mostly just a record about alcoholism, but still good and fun and meaner.  

I can feel that story not only in the lyrics, but the vocals, the angst, power and even kinda fear to extent...how do you translate that into a live set?

P: Hmmm, recognition and validation. That is how we do it. We build something that hopefully recognizes the audience some way so that they can feel it and also validates it for them.

A: High energy, good catharsis, keep it simple.

C: Ehhh medium simple.

dude york | cobra lounge, chicago | 4.1.17 | @thefaakehipster

dude york | cobra lounge, chicago | 4.1.17 | @thefaakehipster

A: As a fan, if you are going to see bands play, those bands have their time to do whatever they want on stage. But I think it is kind of on you to give as much as you can to that fan. We try to give a lot, even if it’s not all the lights and other things that make a show. We will gladly take any lighting fixtures for shows by the way. It is about giving as much as humanly possible and almost trying to force the fan to pay attention.

P: And have fun

J: Hey, that is exactly what I wanted tonight, to get away from real life.

A: Living the “Real World Wicker Park” huh?

J: Yea, it is a tough life out there

A: Especially after you see a ton of bands play and stuff. You are there wanting to keep pushing the shows further and further

P: I worked my favorite venue in Seattle and you’d see the different types of bands perform. You realize the spectrum and what they bring. Sometimes all you need are a few things, less is more, and it is a better show. And also sometimes you can do more with a lot and when it is done right, it is even more pleasing. They know it is entertainment and do not take themselves too seriously. You have to make a relationship with the audience and be aware of it.

I always use funny metaphors to describe bands and artists i write about, what would you use?

A: Like going to karaoke and all of your friends are there and everybody is kind of sad about something, but we are all here to sing songs and get through it. But the karaoke machine is broken. Just get up there and sing. We’ll fix the machine though.

J: I don’t even want to box, but your music makes me wants to get in front of a punching bag. Not because of things are bad, but because I want to get things out.

P: Maybe this is too arrogant, the oldies station in back to the future 2, that is us…we are the greatest hits of every decade! We are like robot DJs.

suggested listening experience: building motivation for anything // outdoor summertime hanging // channeling your anger into something positive

listens: tonight // the way i feel // paralyzed // love is // black jack // something in the way // KEXP performance

dy // spotify // sc // twitter // fb // ig

interview stuff: THE CHAIN GANG OF 1974

reppin: la, usa // modern art records

featuring: Kamtin Karimi Mohager

latest singles: “slow” (see below) and “i still wonder”

albums: Wayward Fire (2011) // Daydream Forever (2014)

kam mohager | backstage, Riviera, chicago | 1.31.17 | @thefaakehipster

kam mohager | backstage, Riviera, chicago | 1.31.17 | @thefaakehipster

A beautiful mixture of 80s synth and reverb rock makes for pure bliss in the ears. I had previously posted on TCGO1974 in August and I’m back with an interview. Kam and his squad have been out supporting AFI on tour...here is my chat with the awesome human:

It’s been awhile since the last full album, makes me think you’ve been hard at work finding the next album’s identity...what has impacted you as far as growth as an individual?

Kam: I like this question cause though Chain Gang was pretty inactive for a few years, me as a writer, I have never been more busy in my life creating music. There was the birth of Teenage Wrist, which started just gaining buzz and momentum without us really doing anything. That was really cool. Towards the end of the Daydream cycle my distaste for CG in general was very strong due to my relationship with Warner Bros and I just couldn't really make music the way I wanted to make it. I found myself writing a lot of songs that were heavier and more guitar driven, as you can see through Teenage Wrist with Marshall, Anthony and Scott. I started focusing on external writing and the first taste of that was with my collaboration with Dillon Francis. That was my first time doing anything like that and landed my first single for a major label release...shit i may be good at this. I’m enjoying myself.

tcgo1974 | 11.6.16 | Riviera Theatre, Chicago | @thefaakehipster

tcgo1974 | 11.6.16 | Riviera Theatre, Chicago | @thefaakehipster

I was able to then book a lot of sessions through my team and work with a bunch of different artists. That helped shaped my writing skills in a better way cause it allowed me to look at pop music differently. Wow, this is a smart way of writing music and I can take what I’m learning and apply it with what I want to do next with CG. Fast forward a few sessions later, I scored some good cuts with Dillon, Luna Shadows, 3OH3, Grace Mitchell…Then I came to this point where I wanted to make the new record and I wasn’t really afraid of pop anymore. There is a way to write something poppy, catchy and hooky but I has always masked it with something in the past. Those 2 ½ years of being able to focus on different things allowed me to become a better writer for this project. (CAPS??)

Moving onto words....i get a lot of reflection, “remember when” sort of vibe from your lyrics...what do hope your fans take away from your stories?

K: Chain Gang is lyrical content and put this band in a certain type of thing. It is more darker side, bare human emotions, but sometimes people don’t wanna listen to that shit. Wayward Fire and Daydream Forever were both written about the same person...you know, shitty ex girlfriends. This time around I was in a happier place and moved on from the past relationship and found myself in a new complicated love stuff. I didn’t want to focus on just that and made me want to touch on some more general human aspects...addiction, heartbreak, breaking off with the label. There are some songs that lyrically sound positive and some that are kinda a bummer, BUT MUSICALLY IT COMES FROM A MUCH HAPPIER AND BRIGHTER PLACE

Kinda in the same sense of injecting feels into your fans, what do you want them to experience during your live set?

K: My live show is always aggressive, more rock. There was always a difference between listening to the record and seeing us live. With this new stuff, how can we reflect our sounds as a full band? So instead of program drums, the new songs have been live drum recorded. The live show, if there is that moment to feed from the crowd, that takes me to the next level. I grew up a punk rock kid and being able to jump around and mosh around is what I want kids to experience.

It is a weird time in music...while there is plenty of “new genres” evolving sound and great artists, there is also a ton of bullshit. What positive message do you hope to send in the midst of all of this?

tcgo1974 | the empty bottle | 6.11.14 | @thefaakehipster

tcgo1974 | the empty bottle | 6.11.14 | @thefaakehipster

K: I think there will always be crap out there and people will always view it differently. I don’t know if CG will ever be a household name...I mean I’ve been around and put records out. It is hard when you do something for so long, you really want to see the reward. But I mean, shit, I am at the Riviera in Chicago right now. Will CG be that band that sells out Empty Bottle, headlines the Riviera? At this point, I’m still currently teaching myself to not ask these questions. You just have to do it. I have so many different extensions of my creativity. I can’t always throw all my energy and everything I have into CG or else you just get mentally and physically drained. Just go out and do as much as possible. As a creative person, I’m getting to that point I have this urge to just be creative in other ways. I’’m going to do a lot of exploring when I get home, play around with some ideas and SEE WHAT SPARKS THAT YOUTHFUL FEELING AGAIN.

I don’t know what the public wants...media and society tells you what to like. Maybe those people don’t have much of a grasp of a personality and kind of fall for it. I do like this, but in fact they don’t even know what they like. It kinda goes back to the first part of the question, you just have to go out and do what you believe, be honest and smart about it.

I always use funny metaphors to describe bands and artists i write about, your post: that moment when you bite into the juiciest, most delicious piece of fruit followed by the liquid goodness down your throat...your turn

K: Mannnnnn I can’t give an answer only because I knew when I started this project 10 years ago. First song I released in December of 2006 on MYSPACE. It has evolved and that was my desire and purpose with this project; never to release the same thing twice. And granted, yes, the band kinda found its world and grew within that, but it was this big bubble of everything. There were moments when I wanted to be BRMC, trying to be LCD, Daft Punk, Talking Heads….THIS BUBBLE WAS KINDA BOUNCING BACK AND FORTH, BACK AND FORTH AND THEN ANOTHER LITTLE BUBBLE POPPED OUT...oh wait, that’s the metaphor!!

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